ZIMINGZHONG 凝时聚珍: CLOCKWORK TREASURES FROM CHINA’S FORBIDDEN CITY NOW OPEN
Science Museum Blog
by Science Museum
1w ago
Last week, the Science Museum opened a new exhibition featuring 23 resplendent mechanical clocks on loan from The Palace Museum in Beijing and never before displayed together in the UK. The exhibition launch was celebrated with a special themed Chinese New Year Lates, where visitors had the chance to enjoy a spectacular lion and dragon dance performance in partnership with London Chinatown Chinese Association. The exhibition shines a light on the Chinese emperors’ obsessive collection of these remarkable clockwork instruments, as the origins of the unique trade, and the inner workings of the e ..read more
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Happy birthday, Bessie Coleman!
Science Museum Blog
by Guest authors
3w ago
Bessie Coleman was the first African American woman to receive a pilot’s licence. A skilled pilot and ‘daredevil aviatrix’, she championed opportunities for women and Black people in aviation. Born in Texas on 26 January 1892, Coleman was one of thirteen children. From a young age, she helped her sharecropper mother pick cotton to pay their rent after her father left the family. Yet she showed an aptitude for academia, regularly visiting the local library and becoming the family bookkeeper at eight years old. Studious Coleman completed every grade at her one-room segregated school, achieved a ..read more
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Dawn of a new era for synthetic life
Science Museum Blog
by Roger Highfield
3w ago
In the laboratory that witnessed the dawn of the molecular biology revolution seven decades ago, scientists are creating new kinds of life, and accelerating the pace of evolution. Proteins are the building blocks of all living things and the aim of their research is to create synthetic proteins far beyond the complexity of anything currently made by chemists, from proteins that can be used as novel drugs, such as antibiotics, or that can enhance biomaterials, build molecular machines, create wonder materials, or increase the ability of organisms to absorb greenhouse gases. Molecular structure ..read more
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Preserving musical wonders: from glass instruments to fire-powered harmonies
Science Museum Blog
by Guest authors
1M ago
After a hugely popular run at the Science and Industry Museum in Manchester, Turn It Up: The power of music arrived at the Science Museum in London this autumn. This interactive exhibition explores the mysterious power that music holds over us as well as displaying weird and wonderful instruments. But before going on display, these objects were in the careful hands of our conservators who prepared them for their moment in the limelight. Conservators Julie McBain and Diana Hepworth look into the care given to two objects which have been part of Turn It Up, and look back on their meticulous work ..read more
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What awaits us in 2024?
Science Museum Blog
by Roger Highfield
1M ago
‘Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future!’ This wry quotation has been attributed to various figures, from the Nobel prize-winning quantum physicist Niels Bohr to legendary American baseball player Yogi Berra. Even though peering into the future remains an uncertain science, it is much easier over the short term: I am preparing to discuss what the coming year holds in store for us at a Lates on 1 February with Cat De Lange, the editor of New Scientist, Science Museum curator Laura Joy Pieters and Matt Reynolds of Wired, all under the watchful eye of maths celebrity Bo ..read more
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Happy Birthday Mary Somerville!
Science Museum Blog
by Guest authors
2M ago
I am extremely deaf, and my memory […] is failing, but not for mathematical and scientific subjects. I am still able to read books on the higher algebra for four or five hours in the morning, and even to solve the problems. Sometimes I find them difficult, but my old obstinacy remains, for if I do not succeed to-day, I attack them again on the morrow. In 1872, 91-year-old mathematician and science writer Mary Somerville noted in her autobiography how some of her faculties had started to diminish in her old age. Her passion for mathematical problems, however, was still as strong as it had been ..read more
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Updating stars and observing the Andromeda Galaxy
Science Museum Blog
by Guest authors
2M ago
`Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi’s (also known by the Latinised name Azophi) wrote his famous star catalogue, the Book of the Fixed Stars (Kitāb Ṣuwar al-kawākib al-thābitah), around 964 AD.  It enlarged and revised the Almagest, the work of the great 2nd century AD Alexandrian astronomer Ptolemy. Al-Sufi’s star catalogue added illustrations of the constellations, along with new material, including Al-Sufi’s own astronomical observations. Most of the individual star names still in use today derive from Al-Sufi’s star catalogue, easily recognisable from their Arabic terminology including Aldebaran ..read more
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Science Museum Christmas Gift Guide
Science Museum Blog
by Science Museum
3M ago
From themed Christmas jumpers, make-your-own robots to a solar system lamp, we’ve got you covered with our gift guide, whether it’s for a stocking filler or gifting unique experiences at the museum all year-round. Our mission is to inspire the next generation with science and every purchase (large or small) will help support our future activities. What’s more, the Science Museum shop is currently having a sale, with 10% off everything until Sunday 26 November. Here’s a round-up of some of this season’s must-haves for Christmas… GIFTS UP TO £10 GLOW IN THE DARK STARS & PLANETS£5.00 Bring t ..read more
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Building for the Fans: Daleks and Doctor Who
Science Museum Blog
by Glyn Morgan
3M ago
As Doctor Who celebrates the landmark of its 60th anniversary, it seems appropriate for the Science Museum to mark the occasion with an object which celebrates the fans who sustained this iconic show through its many highs and lows. Fans are the lifeblood of any creative endeavour, but this is particularly powerful point for science fiction: were it not for the continued enthusiasm from fans then Doctor Who might have died never to be regenerated after initially leaving the air in 1989, or after the underperforming TV-movie in 1996 (starring the criminally underrated Paul McGann).  Exampl ..read more
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Virtual Heart: A new simulation revealed
Science Museum Blog
by Science Museum
3M ago
Still images from the display of the Virtual Heart model showing the way blood moves through the organ. The complex and beautiful simulation of a beating human heart was created by bioengineer Dr Jazmín Aguado Sierra using scans of her own heart. It shows the complex interactions between electrical impulses, muscle contraction and blood flow in the heart – a feat only possible using supercomputer power.  Dr Aguado Sierra used her own data captured from sources including electrocardiographs that measured electrical impulses and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of her heart tissues.&n ..read more
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