Japan’s royal tombs
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
1M ago
These tombs were the final resting places of Japan’s ancient elites, and form part of a broader East Asian funerary tradition, aspects of which they emulate. Such burial mounds are so distinctive a feature of the archaeology that the era from AD 250-710 is known as the Kofun period. The post Japan’s royal tombs appeared first on World Archaeology ..read more
Visit website
CWA 123 – out now
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
1M ago
In ancient Japan, royal burial mounds could be magnificent monuments. The distinctive keyhole-shaped earthwork associated with the semi-legendary Emperor Nintoku, for example, is 486m long and ranks as one of the largest tombs ever constructed. In our cover feature, we explore how these burial mounds could create a potent statement of royal power, while also containing sumptuous grave goods that provide a fascinating glimpse of traditions in both life and death. Some display clear connections with continental Asia, revealing the role of overseas influences in elite power. When it comes to subt ..read more
Visit website
The lost world of Sanxingdui
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
3M ago
Sanxingdui has produced a wealth of startling Bronze Age artefacts. Many of these treasures were deliberately smashed or burnt before being buried, raising questions about what they were used for and how they met their end. The post The lost world of Sanxingdui appeared first on World Archaeology ..read more
Visit website
CWA 122 – out now
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
3M ago
The finds from Sanxingdui are sensational. In 1986, two pits were discovered by chance within this ancient city. The contents proved to be simultaneously stunning and shocking. While the contents included a wealth of sumptuous sculptures, their style was without any obvious parallel in China, or anywhere else. It seemed that the Bronze Age inhabitants of Sanxingdui developed a unique view of the world, and then immortalised it in metalwork. Now, six more pits have been examined, with results that are every bit as electrifying. In our cover feature, we learn the latest news about a spellbinding ..read more
Visit website
China unearthed
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
5M ago
Deep underground, the ancient inhabitants of what is now China built remarkable houses and palaces. But these dwellings were not homes for the living. Instead, the dead would be laid there, not to rest, but to live out their afterlife in comfort. The post China unearthed appeared first on World Archaeology ..read more
Visit website
CWA 121 – out now
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
5M ago
It started with the soil. The thick yellow loess that blankets much of northern China proved perfect for building city walls and platforms supporting timber buildings. Tombs could also be dug deep into this earth without causing it to collapse. It is within such tombs that many of the most astonishing treasures to survive from ancient China have been found. Because the dead were believed to live on in these tombs, the objects accompanying them allow us to write biographies of the deceased. But these artefacts also tell a much wider story about how China itself developed over thousands of The p ..read more
Visit website
La Tène
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
8M ago
When La Tène was discovered more than 150 years ago, the site gave its name to the second half of the Iron Age across much of Europe, and objects of La Tène type are often equated with the Celts. But what was found at La Tène? Andrew Fitzpatrick and Marc-Antoine Kaeser explore the changing interpretations of this iconic site. The post La Tène appeared first on World Archaeology ..read more
Visit website
CWA 120 – out now
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
8M ago
Fishermen were landing some extraordinary catches in mid-19th-century Switzerland. The discovery of prehistoric sites submerged in European lakes prompted a surge in angling for antiquities. In 1857, this fishing for finds led to some telltale timbers being spotted in a small bay on Lake Neuchâtel. The bay was called La Tène, and the finds from it were so significant that the site went on to lend its name to the second half of the European Iron Age. For all its fame, La Tène has remained something of an enigma. Our cover feature explores what the finds tell us about the The post CWA 120 – out ..read more
Visit website
Power or decadence?
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
10M ago
We all know that the finer things in life can transmit messages about wealth and status. In the epic struggles between the Persians and Greeks in the 1st millennium BC, though, luxury came to mean so much more. The post Power or decadence? appeared first on World Archaeology ..read more
Visit website
CWA 119 – out now
World Archaeology Magazine
by Current World Archaeology
10M ago
It is hard not to see them as excessive. The glorious gold and silver vessels that graced elite banquets in the Achaemenid empire showcase the skill of Persian metalworkers. But while the fine details of animals, mythical scenes, and intricate patterns still thrill viewers, did these sumptuous wares ever have a role beyond expressing extreme wealth? In our cover feature, we see how a British Museum exhibition is revealing that this seemingly gratuitous glitz knitted an empire together, and helped its arch foes to forge their own identity. When it comes to changing lifestyles, there can be litt ..read more
Visit website

Follow World Archaeology Magazine on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR