The Cars in My Life
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
1w ago
      My father bought me a 12-year-old gold Studebaker convertible that was a guy magnet. It was the car he wished he had when he was younger. I had just graduated from nursing school in 1962. At 20 years of age, I had little knowledge of car maintenance. The first time I checked the oil (Google this, youngsters) I didn’t know where to return the dip stick. I just tucked it into the engine before I drove from the Jersey Shore to home some 50 miles away. Surprised to find no dip stick when I next opened the hood, I promptly got a lesson in car care from my father.   M ..read more
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Where Am I Going With My Blog? Here Is the Answer
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
1M ago
Throughout my long nursing career, I have felt nurses were mostly invisible. So, from the beginning of my first post eleven years ago, I have stressed that nurses: Were rarely recognized as making a difference in the health care delivery system Have had little input into the policies that affected their practice Were seldom sought out by the media to evaluate current medical events Authored few articles in newspapers or magazines or on social media Published few general interest books about the nursing profession Were relatively invisible compared to the attention physicians received Since t ..read more
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Rethinking the direction of my blog
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
2M ago
Be back soon ..read more
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HOLDING ON
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
3M ago
Re-blogged from November 23, 2014 We met soon after my husband and I moved into a house in a forested community in Chapel Hill. Still working full time, I took my long walks over the weekend. As I trudged up a particularly steep hill, an older man wearing a floppy hat and listing slightly towards the right, ambled towards me. Happy to meet someone from the neighborhood, I stopped to speak with him. He told me that he was a retired physiology professor and strolled the neighborhood trails twice a day to “keep in shape.” When we parted, he touched the brim of his hat and said, “Good day.” So dig ..read more
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Bittersweet Reunion
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
3M ago
Have you ever called a friend because you had a feeling that something awful happened to them? I have and usually it’s a false alarm. I hadn’t heard from our old friends, Jim and Sue (not their real names), in a few months. I had an uncomfortable feeling that things were not right with them. When Jim answered the phone, he told me that the day before he had visited the emergency room. I have written about Jim and Sue before. The last time my husband and I saw them was in Charleston, South Carolina, three years ago. They visit the city each year in April. We have joined them sporadically, tour ..read more
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Surviving a Knee Injury at 80
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
3M ago
Janice Radak, editor of Lower Extremity Review Magazine Online (LER), e-mailed me after I posted a story about my knee injury. Would I write 500 words about my experience? She stated that the readers of LER, such as sports medicine specialists, podiatrists, physical/occupational therapists, as well as lay readers, would gain information/insight from a person like me: former nurse, and older woman. I wasn’t surprised Radak contacted me after I discovered that she had been Editor-in-Chief of the journal Geriatrics. The wealth of life experience older folks can share is often ignored. And since m ..read more
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60th Nursing School Reunion or How Did We Get This Old?
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
4M ago
WE . . . sit at a long table facing multiple pieces of silverware, cloth napkins, sweet tea, and wine and lit by the wall sconces in the restaurant of a historic hotel in Cape May, New Jersey, delighting in the aromas of clam bisque, arugula salad, beef tenderloin and scallops. . . . scan aging faces with familiar voices, exchanging pieces of our lives since our last reunion five years ago, attentive to each other’s tragedies and blessings. . . . listen to the reunion organizer tell us stories sent by those not present, sad for their absence but joyful that the seven of us in advancing years m ..read more
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Counting the Dead
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
4M ago
Ruth and I are counting the dead. Ruth counts 13. I have 11. “We should count anyone who didn’t respond to the invitation as ‘dead’,” she jokes over the phone. I can’t help but laugh. Maybe I’m laughing off the somberness of such a task.  We are putting together a directory of Saint Peter’s School of Nursing, in New Brunswick, NJ, class of ’62 to pass out to the attendees at our reunion next week in Cape May. It’s bizarre that Ruth and I don’t share an accurate list of our fellow classmates who have passed away in the last 60 years! I have three lists of information in front of me. Ruth ..read more
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When A Compliment Is Not A Compliment.
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
5M ago
I’ve written many posts about ageism. What I’ve not addressed is how older persons could react to the “compliment” that we look or act so “young,” as if youth is the gold standard and “aging” is undesirable. (Notice I did not say SHOULD since I’m not giving advice but laying out my thoughts on ageism)  Until aging is recognized as the normal trajectory of life and not as a state to be ignored or disparaged, an older person will continue to be thought of as persona non grata. Accepting the “compliment,” the older person might also accept that youth is desirable and internalize feelings of ..read more
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Getting the Message the Second Time Around
Nursing Stories
by Marianna Crane
6M ago
I read the book before. My husband had been impressed with dancer, choreographer, and author Twyla Tharp’s interview on the car radio and bought her book for me: Keep It Moving: Lessons for the Rest of Your Life. It was motivational and I breezed through it. Afterwards the book sat on our coffee table. I picked it up a few days ago and randomly opened to page 123 where Twyla talks of breaking a bone while she is teaching a group of children to dance. As she demonstrates a position, her foot collapses and she cracks the metatarsal bone in her toe. Here’s what she says:      ..read more
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