Why a Lemon is Yellow
Food Crumbles
by Chef Science
6d ago
No, we can’t answer the philosophical question, of why a lemon has a yellow color. But, we can explain what it is that makes a lemon yellow. Hint, it’s molecules, a specific group of molecules called carotenoids. Colour of lemons is given by carotenoids Lemons are a type of citrus fruit and like most of their related species, such as oranges and grapefruits, they have a bright colour. Lemons of course, are yellow. Despite all being a different color, the color of most citrus fruits is due to the same group of molecules: carotenoids. These molecules have a unique structure… The post Why a Lemon ..read more
Visit website
Why Soak Your Fruit For Weeks For a Christmas Cake
Food Crumbles
by Chef Science
3w ago
Some say you need a year, others say you can’t start any later than at Stir-Up Sunday, and yet others make it in a day: Christmas cake (or pudding, definitions overlap somewhat but not completely). So what’s the correct answer? We decided to investigate and came across disappointingly little science, but, a lot of experience (and opinions). There’s not a single piece of scientific literature that gets even close to trying to answer that question. So, we did a little test ourselves and gathered information, because, it turns out, it depends. You can make a great cake a few days… The post Why So ..read more
Visit website
What Makes an Orange, Orange?
Food Crumbles
by Chef Science
1M ago
Oranges are orange. Not sure which was named first here, the fruit or the color? But, that’s not what we’re interested in anyway. We want to know, why oranges have this bright, orange color, what is the chemistry behind it all? The orange color in oranges can be attributed to a specific group of molecules called carotenoids. Their unique chemical structure ensures light is reflected in such a way that we perceive the orange, as being orange! Carotenoids color oranges orange Oranges are orange, thanks to the presence of a group of molecules called carotenoids. Carotenoids are pigments, and can ..read more
Visit website
How Eggs Yolks Thicken Custards, Pies, Desserts, and More
Food Crumbles
by Chef Science
1M ago
Custard ice cream, creme brulée, lemon meringue pie. They all rely on egg yolks. Without them, custards melt too quickly, creme brulées are runny, and the pie filling wouldn’t set. Egg yolks can thicken liquids. But, it’s a fine balance. Handled incorrectly and they may curdle or scramble. It’s truly a matter of knowing your eggs and how best to treat them. Egg yolks need heat to thicken All of the applications mentioned in the start have something crucial in common. They’ve all undergone some sort of heat treatment. The custard was cooked, the creme brulee and pie were baked.… The post How Eg ..read more
Visit website
The Science of Tempering Chocolate + An Easy Way to Temper
Food Crumbles
by Chef Science
1M ago
If you’ve ever watched a tv baking show, chances are, you’ve seen participants trying to temper chocolate at some point. Often, this is a recipe for some drama (which is of course why it’s part of a tv show…). Chocolate tempering can be finicky and some contestants are bound to miss the mark. However, untempered, chocolate just doesn’t look as good. It won’t be glossy, nor snappy. So, for high-quality chocolate products tempering is unavoidable. Even though tempering may seem an art, there’s a lot of science behind it. It’s all about controlling the crystallization of fat crystals. There’s jus ..read more
Visit website
Books to Help You Understand the Science of Cooking
Food Crumbles
by Chef Science
2M ago
There are a lot of food books out there. The vast majority are of course cookbooks, collections of recipes. Some with an educational aspect, others purely for entertainment, and yet again others even take some time to discuss the science behind food. We love a good book on food and have collected quite a few. We especially enjoy those books that teach something new, shine a new light on a food, or just teach us something about a type or culture of food that we aren’t familiar with yet. Here you’ll find all books that we’ve reviewed on this website.… The post Books to Help You Understand the Sc ..read more
Visit website
The Science of Cheese
Food Crumbles
by Chef Science
2M ago
From protein science, to milk analysis, from paneer, to Parmigiano, the world of cheese is a big and complex one. It’s easy to build an entire career around the topic of cheese-making, make that more than one career if you include plant-based cheeses. The science of cheese is fascinating and it’s why we’ve written about it on FoodCrumbles in quite a few places. Here, we’re collecting that knowledge together in one place. Cheese starts as milk Cheese starts out as milk. A complex, fascinating product full of proteins, fat, sugars and plenty of minerals and vitamins, that just so happens… The po ..read more
Visit website
TaaiTaai – A Tough Dutch ‘Cookie’
Food Crumbles
by Chef Science
2M ago
Taaitaai, literally translated, it means ‘toughtough’. It’s a Dutch style of cookie that you’ll only find in stores in November, until early December. With a slight anise seed flavor it’s a main stay of the ‘Sinterklaas’ celebration season. The reason it’s called ‘toughtough’? Probably because it is quite a tough rye-based cookie! It’s not straightforward to make, requiring a very firm dough that can be hard to handle. And, it’s a little tough to eat. That is, you need some proper chewing. But, that does make for quite a unique type of cookie. An rich, but vague history Taaitaai belongs… The p ..read more
Visit website
How Malted Grains Are Made – The Magic of Malting
Food Crumbles
by Scienchef
2M ago
Brewers need malt to make delicious beer. Bakers use malt or diastatic powder to optimize their daily bread. Malt is a grain that’s been allowed to sprout, but only just a little. This ensures that all valuable sugars and proteins in the grain become available for the brewers and bread bakers. It’s a surprisingly complex, but fascinating topic. This is a guest post by Niels Langenaeken who researches the role of cereals in beer brewing at the KU Leuven where he’s part of the Laboratory of Food Chemistry & Biochemistry. He also coordinates the postgraduate program Malting and Brewing Scienc ..read more
Visit website
How Cheese is Made – A Complete Process Overview
Food Crumbles
by Scienchef
3M ago
There is not one way to make cheese. Instead, there are hundreds, if not thousands of ways to make cheese. Resulting in countless different types of cheese with each their own characteristics. Even within one variety, there are countless little tweaks that you can make that will impact the color, flavor, texture, and more of the final cheese. As such, don’t expect and detailed a step-by-step guide. Instead, we’ll walk you through the most commonly used process steps. From curdling to pressing to ripening. We’ll introduce you to the complex, but fascinating world of cheese making. It all starts ..read more
Visit website

Follow Food Crumbles on Feedspot

Continue with Google
OR