Boulders vs boat ramp vs biosecurity
Conservation blog – Islands
by Department of Conservation
3M ago
How to replace a boat ramp on one of the country’s most precious islands This is a story about revamping a boat ramp. Sure, we appreciate it doesn’t sound like a story that will float most peoples’ boat, but what if we told you it involves more than 100 helicopter trips, dodging boulders, hard-working conservation dogs, and one very special island? Te Hauturu-o-Toi/Little Barrier Island is a nature reserve in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park/Ko te Pātaka kai o Tīkapa, administered by us through a joint conservation management plan with Ngāti Manuhiri. With one of the most unmodified fore ..read more
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Learning by doing: Brent Beaven, PF2050
Conservation blog – Islands
by Brent Beaven
1y ago
New Zealand’s Predator Free 2050 goal — to eradicate rats, stoats and possums from the entire country by mid-century — is globally unique and unattempted. There’s no manual to guide us, no precedent to follow. How, then, do we make sure we get this right? This is the sixth blog in Brent’s PF2050 series. By Brent Beaven, Programme Manager Predator Free 2050 Brent Beaven, standing in front of trees : Capital Kiwi If we consider that PF2050 is a solution to a problem, then our first step is to try to understand the nature of that problem. People broadly recognise three kinds of problem: simp ..read more
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We’re worried about mohua
Conservation blog – Islands
by Department of Conservation
1y ago
Here’s how things are looking right now for mohua/yellowhead; and why conservation will continue to require a lot of ingenuity and quick thinking, in advance of meeting our Predator Free 2050 goal. Which makes for some weird and wonderful work stories … By the Department of Conservation Mohua / yellowhead bird on Anchor Island : Leon Berard – leonberardphotography.co.nz We’re worried about mohua—not just mohua, but definitely mohua—as these tiny kowhai/yellow creatures are currently embroiled in a battle for survival they’re too small, too bright, too loud and too smelly to win on their own ..read more
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The MIQ experience – 149 years ago
Conservation blog – Islands
by Department of Conservation
1y ago
Quarantine may be a hot topic right now, but it is nothing new. The heritage on Matiu/Somes island is an important reminder of pandemics past before it became a jewel in our pest free island network. Senior Heritage Advisor Richard Nester shares with us the MIQ experience from 149 years ago… The view on Matiu/Somes Island today. Harbour Islands around the world were once the preferred location for managed isolation and quarantine. Their natural remoteness and the ability to easily service them from a port town or city ticked a lot of the logistical needs.  Last month marked one year ..read more
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A night on Ōtamahua/Quail Island
Conservation blog – Islands
by Department of Conservation
1y ago
To celebrate NZ Archaeology Week last year we asked young people to share stories about their favourite historic places. Sarah-Kate Simons was one of our fantastic winners and won a night on Ōtamahua/Quail Island. She shares with us her experience… Sarah outside Ōtamahua Hut When I won DOC’s ‘Sharing our Stories’ competition, my prize was an overnight stay with my family in one of their huts. We picked Quail Island just out of Lyttelton harbour, since it’s one of our favourite spots to spend a day outing, so why not a night outing? It definitely had nothing to do with my childhood dream of liv ..read more
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The hihi volunteer’s guide to Tiritiri Matangi Island
Conservation blog – Islands
by Department of Conservation
1y ago
So you want to be a hihi volunteer? Well you’ve come to the right place; this guide will tell you all you need to know from one volunteer to another. Grab your sunscreen, hiking boots and binoculars, and let’s get going. A ranger’s abode on Tiritiri Matangi | Photo: Drew HeathThe Location Tiritiri Matangi Island is located in the Hauraki Gulf, a 75min ferry ride from Auckland CBD. Known by many Aucklanders as “the bird island” this scientific reserve is teeming with native wildlife you might never see on the mainland such as reclusive geckos, endangered insects and of course many species of na ..read more
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Aotea/Great Barrier Island set to re-open
Conservation blog – Islands
by Department of Conservation
2y ago
Hokia ki ō maunga kia purea ai koe e ngā hau a Tāwhirimātea. Return to your mountains so that you can be cleansed by the winds of Tāwhirimātea. Hirakimata lookout, looking towards Hauturu/Little Barrier : DOC As we watched the world struggle to take the helm of this global pandemic Aotearoa was plunged back into the uncertainty of fast-moving, ever-changing lockdown systems and Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland, home to 1.6 million, stood still while most of Aotearoa kept moving. For most of us living in the super city, watching the announcement was a hard pill to swallow. But what did that mean for us ..read more
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Pou whenua installed on Ōtamahua/Quail Island
Conservation blog – Islands
by Department of Conservation
4y ago
The addition of a large pou whenua on Ōtamahua/Quail Island is a welcome sight for tangata whenua, on an island with a long and rich history. Ōtamahua is a 81 hectare pest-free island managed by the Department of Conservation in Whakaraupō / Lyttelton Harbour. The idea for the pou whenua came from Whakaraupō Carving Centre and was completed as part of a regeneration plan led by Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke around areas of cultural significance in Whakaraupō. With the assistance of funding from the Ngāi Tahu Fund for the carving, Ngāti Wheke commissioned Whakaraupō Carving Centre to create the impres ..read more
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Long term volunteering on Stewart Island/ Rakiura
Conservation blog – Islands
by Department of Conservation
4y ago
One of Rakiura’s long term volunteers talks about her experience and how it’s helped her understand and get involved in conservation work.  Jess on the edge of a sand dune system at Mason Bay. This is how you hunt weeds: Put on your gumboots. Assemble a team of Biodiversity staff and volunteers. Select your appropriate tools, such as a hand saw and target-appropriate herbicide. Grab a GPS and turn on tracking. Line up, adjust your compass, and commence grid searching. Stare at the ground and walk in a straight line, ideally no more than five metres from the person next to you. Stop ..read more
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