TITEN: a new phase of Biennale Jogja
New Mandala
by Asep Topan
3d ago
Editor’s note for new subscribers: this piece appears as part of New Mandala’s ARTSEA series. Edited by the Australian National University’s Dr Elly Kent, ARTSEA features regular commentary and essays on art, design and architecture in Southeast Asia. You can visit the ARTSEA homepage here. It has long been the case that art biennials are almost impossible to witness in their entirety. Since the proliferation of media, contemporary art has been characterised by lively projects rather than static monolithic works, including artistic-research approaches and collaboration with non-artistic practi ..read more
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Explaining the Prabowo landslide
New Mandala
by Sana Jaffrey & Eve Warburton
1w ago
According to all credible quick counts, Prabowo Subianto will be the next president of Indonesia. He and his running mate, President Joko Widodo’s son Gibran Rakabuming Raka, won the three-way race with a convincing 58% of the votes, easily clearing the 50% threshold required to win in a single round. The losing candidates, former Jakarta governor Anies Baswedan and former Central Java governor Ganjar Pranowo, may challenge these results in the Constitutional Court, and some protest from civil society groups is expected. But it is unlikely that the outcome will change given the large margin of ..read more
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Erratum: “Indonesians want a more diverse legislature”
New Mandala
by New Mandala
2w ago
Readers who received the email notification of the new post “Indonesians want a more diverse legislature” should know that this piece was published under the wrong byline. The piece wasn’t authored be me, as the previous email from New Mandala would have you believe, but rather Eve Warburton, Edward Aspinall, Diego Fossati, Burhanuddin Muhtadi and Sally White. My apologies to readers and the authors for the error, which has been corrected on the New Mandala website. Liam Gammon | the editor The post Erratum: “Indonesians want a more diverse legislature” appeared first on New Mandala ..read more
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Indonesians want a more diverse legislature
New Mandala
by Eve Warburton, Edward Aspinall, Diego Fossati, Burhanuddin Muhtadi & Sally White
2w ago
Most domestic and international commentary on Indonesia’s 14 February elections has focused on the presidential race. But on the same day, Indonesians will also vote for legislators at district, provincial and national levels. Almost 10,000 candidates will compete for the national legislature alone, in what will be the country’s sixth legislative election since the collapse of Suharto’s authoritarian regime in 1998. Legislative elections are a vibrant affair in Indonesia. The streets are plastered with campaign posters months in advance of voting day, candidates hold gruelling rounds of public ..read more
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Video: Roundtable on Indonesia’s 2024 elections
New Mandala
by New Mandala
1M ago
On 29 January, the Indonesia Institute at the Australian National University hosted an online roundtable featuring ANU-based scholars to discuss the outlook for Indonesia’s 2024 presidential and legislative elections. Moderated by the Institute’s chair Dr Eve Warburton, speakers canvassed the state of the race, the issues of democratic quality and policymaking that are at stake in the conduct and outcome of the elections. About the speakers Greg Fealy is an Emeritus Professor at ANU. He is a scholar of Indonesian politics and history, who specialises in Islam. He has written extensively on th ..read more
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From polarisation to opportunism: organised Islam and the 2024 elections
New Mandala
by Alexander R. Arifianto & Aisah Putri Budiatri
1M ago
In Indonesia’s 2019 presidential election, the flow of support from Islamic groups to the two presidential tickets was distinctly polarised. Conservatives rallied behind Prabowo Subianto and Sandiaga Uno, whereas Nahdlatul Ulama (NU)—the country’s biggest Islamic organisation, which claims to represent up to 90 million Muslims—unequivocally endorsed Joko Widodo (Jokowi) and Ma’ruf Amin. A growth in partisan polarisation among Indonesian Islamic organisations had been evident since the 2014 presidential election, when many NU followers solidifyied their support for Jokowi. It only grew stronger ..read more
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Translating atrocity at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal
New Mandala
by Rachel Killean, Rosemary Grey, Jinhyun Cho and Ludmila Stern
1M ago
In August 2015, roughly one year into the largest trial in the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (otherwise known as the Khmer Rouge Tribunal), a 61-year-old rice farmer named Chhum Seng took the stand. He was there to testify about life during the Democratic Kampuchea period (1975–1979) when Cambodia was ruled by the Communist Party of Kampuchea (CPK), better known as the Khmer Rouge. During his testimony, Chhum Seng was questioned by the Cambodian and UN-appointed lawyers, enabled by simultaneous interpretation between the Court’s three working languages: English, French, and ..read more
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All New Mandala wants for Christmas is your email address
New Mandala
by Liam Gammon
2M ago
Dear readers, Beginning today New Mandala will be taking a break for the Australian Christmas and New Year holidays and will be back in early January. On behalf of myself and our ARTSEA series’ editor Dr Elly Kent I’d like to extend a huge thanks to readers for their support of the site in 2023, and to the busy researchers who put the time aside to write for us. Normally in these end-of-year messages I indulge in a bit of self-congratulation and some breezy observations about the state of Southeast Asia, but here I’ll save your time and get straight to the point. As social media sites—especial ..read more
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Reversing reformasi
New Mandala
by Jacqui Baker
2M ago
Editor’s note: this article is based on the author’s Political Update paper presented at the 2023 ANU Indonesia Update Conference, the full version of which appears in the December 2023 edition of the Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies. •••••••••• In 2023, as the second term of Joko Widodo (Jokowi) concludes and the 2024 election looms, elements of his ruling coalition have renewed strategies of accommodation, co-optation, legal challenge, repression, and coercion to restrict the prospects of open political contestation. Examined in totality, these tactics directly target the core institu ..read more
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Indonesia’s polarisation isn’t dead, just resting
New Mandala
by Seth Soderborg & Burhanuddin Muhtadi
2M ago
Before the election of Joko Widodo as Indonesia’s president in 2014, Indonesian politics was regarded by many observers as being marked by relatively negligible levels of polarisation. This depolarisation flowed from the collusive practices of party elites, which neutralised ideological differences by incorporating opposition parties into the cabinet and preserving wide access to rents. While parties’ backgrounds had ideological components, their behaviour in parliament was most consistent with a patronage logic. Without clear partisan lines at the elite level around which voters might build p ..read more
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