Giving Feedback – The Right Time is Now
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
5d ago
Most of us wait to give negative feedback until it’s the right time, aka the recipient won’t get upset. Or we wait, hoping the situation will resolve itself. If something is really an issue, the likelihood of either happening is pretty slim. The right time to give feedback is shortly after something happens. I’ll offer up the 24-guideline and the one-week rule. Wait 24-hours to give feedback, if you’re upset. But don’t wait longer than a week. The purpose of giving positive or negative feedback (I like the word upgrade feedback) is to motivate someone to replicate or change a behavior. That’s ..read more
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Hinting Won’t Cut It – Ask for What You Want
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
1w ago
Years ago, a guy I was dating asked, “We don’t really need to do anything for Valentine’s Day, do we?” I was taken aback by his question (which was really a statement) and replied, “No, we don’t.” But I didn’t mean it. And when he blew off the ‘holiday’, I was furious and let him know it. Instead of having dinner on Valentine’s Day, we had an ugly conversation and a lousy rest of the week. Asking for what I wanted upfront would have been much less painful. Why is it so hard to ask for what we want, especially from the people who love us? Learn how to get what you want on Valentine’s Day and ev ..read more
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The One Job Interview Question Hiring Managers Must Ask
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
2w ago
There is one job interview question recruiters and hiring managers must ask. And the answer should be a deal-breaker. The most important job interview question for any role in every organization: Tell me about a time you received negative feedback. This is NOT the same question as tell me about a weakness. Or tell me about a time you made a mistake at work. Those are also important job interview questions to ask. But they’re not the most important question. Let’s assume everyone you interview is age sixteen and older. Unless your candidates live in a cave, never speaking to anyone, it’s not po ..read more
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Giving Feedback – Don’t Give Unsolicited Advice
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
1M ago
It’s hard to watch people do things that impact them negatively – personally or professionally. And yet, if they haven’t asked for feedback, people likely won’t listen to unsolicited advice, so don’t bother giving it. If you really want to give unsolicited advice, ask for permission and make sure you get a true “yes” before speaking up. The conversation could go something like this: “I noticed we’re getting behind on the XYZ project. I have a couple of ideas about what we can do. Would you be interested in talking about them?” Or “That Monday meeting is rough. I feel for you. I used to run mee ..read more
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Office Culture: Your Job Isn’t to Make Everyone Happy
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
1M ago
The inspiration for this week’s blog came from the most unlikely source, time with my son. I want each of his days to be exciting and fun. On the days we do nothing but hang out and play at home, I feel like I’ve failed just a little bit. It’s a lot of pressure. Not unlike work and creating an office culture. I want each of my employees to be happy and to enjoy their jobs and enjoy working for me, every day. That can’t and won’t happen. Some days are hard. Some are dull. Sometimes I’m fun and easy to work for. Lots of days I’m not. I had a manager years ago who told me that my need to be liked ..read more
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When Giving Feedback, Less Is More
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
1M ago
People often hoard feedback until a situation becomes so frustrating that they can’t help but speak up. And because they waited too long to say what they think, many more words come tumbling out than is either necessary or helpful. When it comes to giving feedback, less is more. Be specific, give an example or two, and stop talking. If you want people to be receptive to your feedback, make it easier to hear by saying less. By saying less, I don’t mean don’t tell the truth or provide enough information that the person knows precisely what to do differently. I do mean, don’t provide more informa ..read more
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Increase Your Job Satisfaction – Ask for What You Need
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
2M ago
So much has changed in the last few years. And what you need to be happy at work may have changed too. The question is, do the people you work for and with know what you need? You aren’t likely to get what you don’t ask for, but most people don’t ask for very much. We assume that the people we work with will do the right thing without prompting. We’ll get the recognition and compensation we deserve at work because it’s the right thing to do. We’ll be included in important meetings and decisions regardless of from where we are working. If you read this blog regularly, you already know that I’m ..read more
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How to Handle Customer Complaints
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
2M ago
No one likes to hear people complain, especially people who go on, and on, and on. But there is a reason people complain for longer than may seem necessary. For the most part, the people who sound like a broken record don’t feel heard. And when people don’t feel heard, they repeat themselves, again, and again, and again. One of the first practices for how to handle customer complaints taught during customer service training is to acknowledge the other person’s concern. Demonstrate that you listened and heard. We often think that complainers want us to solve their problems. That’s not always th ..read more
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Setting Boundaries – Don’t Apologize for Yourself
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
2M ago
I’m a big fan of taking responsibility and personal accountability. I think being accountable is easier than passing the buck. When I’m accountable, I have more power and control. When someone else is accountable, I have neither. But there’s a difference between being accountable and apologizing for yourself. Last week I vowed to stop saying, “I’m sorry.” And yet, the next words out of my mouth were apologetic.  Apologizing for oneself is so natural, it’s pervasive, aka, a hard habit to break. Below are a few strategies for being accountable but not apologetic: Establish clear prioritie ..read more
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Effective Performance Appraisals – Raise Performance and Morale
Shari Harley
by Shari Harley
2M ago
Most people would rather get a root canal than participate in an annual performance appraisal. The reasons performance appraisals are so difficult is simple: Most managers don’t deliver timely and balanced (positive and negative) feedback throughout the year. Many employees don’t ask for regular feedback. Too much information is delivered during the annual employee performance appraisal. And as crazy as it sounds, managers and employees haven’t agreed to give and receive regular and candid feedback. Performance appraisals don’t have to be the worst day of the year. Here are four steps to en ..read more
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