How to solve a mass stranding: what caused 77 healthy whales to die on a Scottish beach?
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Philip Hoare
7h ago
A team of scientists are trying to find the cause of what is becoming an increasingly common event – and the answer may be hidden deep in the whales’ skulls A mass stranding last week that led to the deaths of 77 pilot whales on the Orkney island of Sanday was the largest ever recorded of the species on British shores. Initially, 12 of the animals at Tresness beach were still alive – but sadly did not survive. The event occurred almost exactly a year after the stranding of 55 pilot whales on Tolsta beach on the Isle of Lewis in the Hebrides on 16 July 2023. All but one of those whales died. Ac ..read more
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Blood thinner could be used to treat cobra venom, global study suggests
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Sharlotte Thou
20h ago
Snakebites, the ‘deadliest of neglected tropical diseases’ often impact rural communities the most, but a new study offers hope Get our morning and afternoon news emails, free app or daily news podcast A commonly used blood thinner can be used as an antidote to cobra venom, an international study has found, research that a Queensland expert has called “really exciting”. In the study, published in the Journal of Science Translational Medicine on Thursday, Prof Nicholas Casewell described snakebites as the “deadliest of neglected tropical diseases, with its burden landing overwhelmingly on rur ..read more
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North Atlantic right whale seen off Ireland for first time in 114 years
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Chris Baraniuk
1d ago
There are fewer than 400 of critically endangered species left and sighting gives ‘glimmer of hope’ A critically endangered North Atlantic right whale has been spotted off the coast of Ireland for the first time in more than a century. Holidaymaker Adrian Maguire, from County Tyrone in Northern Ireland, glimpsed the large, dark body of the whale on the surface of the water while out fishing for mackerel ..read more
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Winning images of the 2024 BigPicture natural world photography competition
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Guardian Staff
1d ago
A fox in the sun, fireflies and a brush fire, and trees blanketed with butterflies are among the striking images caught by winners of the California Academy of Sciences’ annual contest. Now in its 11th year, it highlights biodiversity and the many threats our planet faces ..read more
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Country diary: Feeding time for the swallows and martins | Derek Niemann
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Derek Niemann
1d ago
Sandy, Bedfordshire: There’s so much to take in, watching them carve through the air, close cousins but with such different techniques Summer westerlies blow across the open fields, and swallows and martins know where to go. Though they are genetically close cousins, tripping off the tongue as a matched pair, such tricky conditions see these birds feed in quite different ways. House martins play the role of day-flying bats, but without the onboard hi-tech of echolocation. They flock where insects swarm and see what is invisible to us. A dozen or more are carving the air behind a long, bushy sh ..read more
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From the archive: The elephant vanishes: how a circus family went on the run – podcast
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Written by Laura Spinney and read by Ben Norris. Originally produced by Esther Opoku-Gyeni with additions and scoring by Silas Gray. The executive producer was Ellie Bury
1d ago
Dumba has spent her life performing in circuses around Europe, but in recent years animal rights activists have been campaigning to rescue her. When it looked like they might succeed, Dumba and her owners disappeared. By Laura Spinney ..read more
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Scientists set up webcam in Colorado rattlesnake ‘mega den’ with up to 2,000 reptiles
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Associated Press
2d ago
Researchers say rattlesnakes have an undeservedly maligned reputation but are social creatures who make good mothers A “mega den” with as many as 2,000 rattlesnakes isn’t top binge-watching for many people. But a round-the-clock webcam in Colorado is providing a viewing bonanza for scientists and other snake enthusiasts whose observations are helping to broaden understanding of these unusual – and undeservedly maligned – reptiles. The remote site on private land in northern Colorado is on a hillside full of rock crevices where the snakes can keep warm and hide from predators ..read more
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‘Instead of crisps, kids could eat snacks from the sea’: the forager chef looking to revolutionise Chile’s diet
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Charis McGowan in Santiago, Chile
2d ago
From ‘sea carrots’ to the rubbery luga, Rodolfo Guzmán is on a mission to transform seaweed’s unique salty flavours into irresistible bites Rodolfo Guzmán produces a carrot-shaped pod of algae from one of the packed shelves in his test kitchen in the Chilean capital, Santiago: “Put it on your tongue for five seconds,” he instructs. An explosion of salty flavour ensues. “Imagine getting more kids to eat stuff like this!” he says, eagerly. “Instead of processed snacks like Pringles, they could eat something healthy and delicious from the sea ..read more
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‘Lo and behold’: world’s rarest whale may have washed up on New Zealand beach
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Helen Sullivan
2d ago
Mysterious spade tooth whales have never been seen alive, or whole, but scientists think a perfect specimen may just have washed up on a beach The world’s rarest whale may have just washed up on a beach in New Zealand. Spade-toothed whales, a type of beaked whale named for their teeth resembling the spade-like “flensing” blade once used to strip whales of their blubber, have never been seen alive. Knowledge of their existence is mostly based on a series of bones and tissue discovered decades apart and later sequenced, showing a new, shared DNA. But scientists in New Zealand believe that a whol ..read more
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Country diary: A master of flight meets its match | Mark Cocker
The Guardian » Wildlife News
by Mark Cocker
2d ago
Combs Moss, Derbyshire: Watching an oak eggar moth is hard enough, with its jinking, unpredictable flight. Somehow, hobbies hunt them The best indication of the hobby’s hunting prowess is that this falcon elicits specific vocal responses from some of its prey, including swallows and martins. In swallow-speak, “hobby” and “deep danger” are synonyms. That’s because hobbies have the agility to take some of the world’s most notable winged organisms – swifts, dragonflies, swallows – in flight. The oak eggar moth is another of these aerial marvels, although you might not think it if you met the cate ..read more
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