More than 2,000 anomalies found at former Indian residential school
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  January 18, 2023 By Antonia Gonzales Podcast: Play in new window | Download | Embed Officials at a First Nation in Saskatchewan say they’ve located more than 2,000 anomalies after using radar at the site of a former Indian residential school. As Dan Karpenchuk reports, they have not yet been confirmed as human remains. The ground search of the former Qu’appelle Indian Residential School began about a year and a half ago with the help of ground penetrating radar. So far, searchers have found a jaw bone fragment believed to be from a child of five or six years of age. The bones were dat ..read more
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January is Stalking Awareness Month
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(EAGAN, Minn., January 2023) – January is Stalking Awareness Month as launched in 2004 by the National Center for Victims of Crime to promote recognition of stalking as a crime.  Since then, stalking has been recognized as a crime and precursor to other crimes such as human trafficking, rape and ultimately, murder.  “Stalking is motivated by perpetrators to gain or maintain control over their victims,” said Lori Jump, chief executive officer for StrongHearts Native Helpline. “Historically, the interest was to control people, land and resources.  Today, at least one in four sta ..read more
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A Truly Savage System
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Nevada Public Radio | By Richard Boland| January 12, 2023 SOURCE ICWA does more than protect our children from cultural genocide. It safeguards our tribal sovereignty While most Americans were focused on the 2022-midterm election results, American Indians were searching for clues on how the U.S. Supreme Court might rule in a case that threatens tribes’ very existence. The case, known as Haaland v. Brackeen, was brought by a non-Indian couple (the Brackeens), who adopted two American Indian children. To the casual observer, this case probably looks like state-sanctioned racism in adoption ..read more
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What's ahead in 2023
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2w ago
Betting, adoption lawsuits pose greatest threat to tribes in decades, experts say A lawsuit in Washington state and another case before the U.S. Supreme Court are part of a coordinated campaign that experts say is pushing once-fringe legal theories to the nation’s highest court and represents the most serious challenge to tribal sovereignty in over 50 years. “It could have really big impacts on basically every law Congress has passed that has to do with tribes and tribal citizens,” said Rebecca Nagle, a journalist, citizen of the Cherokee Nation and host of the “This Land” podcast, w ..read more
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60s Scoop survivor reconnects with birth mom, discovers her culture, decades after separation
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2w ago
It took many years for the pair to develop a mother-daughter relationship Rachel Watts · CBC News · January 6, 2023 Tauni Sheldon, pictured when she was about three years old. Sheldon has worked to reconnect and rebuild the relationship with her birth mom after she was taken away as part of the Sixties Scoop three hours after birth. (Submitted by Pam Sheldon) WARNING: This story contains distressing details Tauni Sheldon remembers the first time she saw her biological mom. Sheldon was 23 years old.  It was 1993 and she was in the Winnipeg airport, having just flown in with her adopt ..read more
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The ‘60s Scoop stole so much from my family. Here’s how I’m reclaiming what’s lost.
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3w ago
HIDE CAMP: Unlike past generations, I was raised not to feel ashamed of being Anishinaabe. Now, I’m learning what my mother and grandmother couldn’t. By Alessia Passafiume | Dec. 11, 2022 I asked my dad to skin me a deer. For as long as I can remember, my father, uncles and grandfather — who immigrated to Canada from Italy 55 years ago — have spent weeks away hunting moose, deer, turkey, rabbits, and if you consider fishing hunting, they do that, too. I’ve thought about joining them on hunts for years — heading to Bass Pro to deck myself out in hunting gear, sitting with them in tree stands ..read more
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Wyoming: Indigenous women discuss growing up with non-Native guardians
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Clarisse and Pat Harris are in their mid-70s. They live in a white house on a hill in Ethete, Wyoming, with the seven children they’re raising.  In the yard, there’s a chicken coop, a sweat lodge and a view of two snow-capped mountain ranges: the Wind River to the west and the Owl Creek to the north. STORY Federal protections for Native children in jeopardy SOURCE  | December 7, 2022 WYOMING:  The Riverton Peace Mission’s online discussion about the Indian Child Welfare Act highlighted the experiences of two local Indigenous women who were fostered or adopted by no ..read more
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Harvard’s Peabody Museum Keeping Native Remains Is Just One Attack on the Rights of Indigenous Children
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Harvard’s influence on this tragic story cannot be understated.  It stands as a symbol of the early stages of colonialism in America and has not fully reckoned with this past.  In October, Native alumni of Harvard Law School called for the immediate return of more than previously announced 6,500 Native remains in a letter to the president of the University, stating that the institution should “dedicate the resources and place the priority on returning them to the appropriate places and relatives. Not sometime, not soon, but now.” As with Harvard Medical School and Indigen ..read more
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Advocate asks AFN chiefs to ensure $40B settlement deal leaves no child behind
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OTTAWA — A First Nations child welfare advocate on Wednesday implored chiefs to ensure "no child is left behind" in a landmark $40-billion settlement agreement with the federal government. Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press Dec 7, 2022  Karen Osachoff, left, speaks as Melissa Walterson stands beside her during the Assembly of First Nations special chiefs assembly in Ottawa on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022.  Chiefs at the assembly heard from the two women about the harms caused by the child-welfare system and are expected to vote on how the AFN should move forward with a landmark settleme ..read more
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Counterspin: Jen Deerinwater on Indian Child Welfare Act
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1M ago
CounterSpin: Those listeners who have heard about Haaland v. Brackeen will know that that Supreme Court case is about considering the Indian Child Welfare Act—which is aimed at keeping Native communities together—to be “race-based,” and therefore unfair and unconstitutional.  Opposing the actual mission of those who want to eliminate the Indian Child Welfare Act is just…reality: the reality that made the Act necessary in the first place, and the reality that will likely ensue if it is repealed.  In the worst-case scenario, Tribal sovereignty and nationhood would be eliminated, with ..read more
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