JHI Issue 84.1 Now Available
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
2d ago
The new issue of the Journal of the History of Ideas (January 2023, 84.1) is now live on Project MUSE. Over the coming weeks, we will publish short interviews with some of the authors featured in this issue about the historical and historiographical context of their respective essays. Look out for these conversations under the rubric Broadly Speaking. *** Table of Contents Volume 84, Issue 1 Rome as “Part of the Heavens”: Leon Battista Alberti’s Descriptio urbis Romae (ca. 1450) and Ptolemy’s Almagest by Maren Elisabeth Schwab Occupy the Commonplaces: Machiavelli and ..read more
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Reinhart Koselleck at One Hundred
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
2d ago
By Jonathon Catlin On April 23, 2023, one of the pioneers of German conceptual history, Reinhart Koselleck (1923–2006), would have turned one hundred years old. Born in Görlitz, in Eastern Germany, Koselleck became one of the leading German historians of his generation and a founder of historical studies at the University of Bielefeld, where he taught for most of his career and trained a generation of conceptual historians who continue to carry on his legacy at universities around the world. Between 1972 and 1997, Koselleck co-edited, together with Werner Conze and Otto Brunner, the eight-vo ..read more
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Haitian Terror in Italian Eyes
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
1w ago
By Elena Barattini It was the 19th of April 1840. The Villanueva, a packet boat flying the Spanish flag, dropped anchor in the flocked harbor of Havana. Fifteen passengers disembarked and stepped foot on Spanish territory. Among them, there was an Italian traveler, getting acquainted with the bureaucratic procedures of the colonial government and the two routine British inspections of the vessel. In fact, as all male passengers were requested to present a papeleta (document) to reach the mainland, two groups of British officers had already fathomed the craft, looking for dreadful proofs of “d ..read more
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Sex, Law, and Sovereignty in French Algeria: Disha Karnad Jani interviews Judith Surkis
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
1w ago
In this latest episode of In Theory, Disha Karnad Jani interviews Judith Surkis, Professor of History at Rutgers University, about her book Sex, Law, and Sovereignty in French Algeria, 1830-1930 (Cornell University Press, 2019).  Surkis’s book interrogates how the French colonial state used its construction of Muslim law to reconfigure property and sovereignty in Algeria. Through fantasies of Algerian men’s sexual practices, a re-arrangement of Algerian women’s legal status, and a re-location of Muslim law from the realm of property rights to the realm of sex, the French colonial state ..read more
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“Zamanawi-Seletane”: Three Intellectual Responses to Modernity in Ethiopia
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
2w ago
By Fasil Merawi  This piece has the goal of introducing three groups of intellectuals who hold distinct views on Ethiopia’s venture into modernity. If one wants to understand the general spirit of Ethiopian notions of modernity, zamanawi-seletane [modern civilization] emerges as a major concept. Used to characterize the nature of Ethiopian modernity, zamanawi-seletane signifies adopting instrumental rationality in the face of a threat posed by Western colonizers, while simultaneously recognizing the backwardness of one’s nation. It also implies introducing the latest achievements of the ..read more
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The Ethiopian Socrates on the Shores of Lake Sagatagan 
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
3w ago
By Jonathan Egid Where would you go if you wanted to consult the largest collection of Ethiopian philosophical manuscripts anywhere in the world? Addis Ababa might be a good guess, at the national library or one of the universities. Perhaps elsewhere in the Ethiopian highlands, in the scriptorium of an ancient monastery – Debre Libanos or Abba Garima or one of the hundreds of monastic communities that line the shores of Lake Tana. Or, knowing something of the history of the expropriation of Ethiopian manuscripts, you might think to journey to one of the great libraries of Europe: the Bodleian ..read more
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Where is Ethiopia? From the Hebrew Bible to Attempted Italian Colonization
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
3w ago
By Adam Simmons ‘Ethiopia’ is an ancient toponym that dates to at least the twelfth century BCE. However, it did not refer to the region of the modern-day country until many centuries later. This think piece will look at how modern Ethiopia came to call itself ʾItyoṗya (ኢትዮጵያ). This development was a process that occurred over three millennia but which only began in Ethiopia about c.1300 and was only finally cemented on the global scene during the reign of Menelik II, 600 years later. Yet, it remains to be commonly found in scholarship that appearances to the toponym ‘Ethiopia’ in sources da ..read more
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Forum: Intellectual Histories of Ethiopia
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
3w ago
By the Primary Editors *** What is Ethiopia and where is Ethiopia? At first glance, these questions seem simple enough. However, as our forum “Intellectual Histories of Ethiopia” shows, there have been centuries of complex contestation over the meanings and geographies of Ethiopia. Despite its ancient history and turbulent present, Ethiopia’s contributions to global intellectual histories are still mostly overlooked. Historians of ideas have begun to address the inherent Eurocentrism within the broader field of intellectual history. Recent works have drawn our attention to the extra-European ..read more
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The Counterinsurgent Imagination: An Interview with Joseph Mackay
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
1M ago
Joseph MacKay is a Fellow/Senior Lecturer in the Department of International Relations at the Australian National University. His research focuses on historical international hierarchies, historical international security, and the history of international thought. His first book, The Counterinsurgent Imagination: A New Intellectual History (Cambridge, 2022), draws on his doctoral research. He holds a PhD from the University of Toronto. Thomas Furse is a primary editor of the JHIBlog. He spoke to Mackay about the intellectual history of counterinsurgency wars.   *** TF: You set ..read more
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Iberian Theories of Empire: An Interview with Giuseppe Marcocci
J. History of Ideas Blog
by jhiblog
1M ago
By Elsa Costa Giuseppe Marcocci is an Official Fellow and Lecturer in History at Exeter College and Associate Professor in Iberian History (European and Extra-European, 1450–1800) at the University of Oxford. His research has mostly focused on religious history and the history of political culture. He has written on conversion and persecution of religious minorities in the Iberian kingdoms and their overseas possessions, Spanish and Portuguese debates over race and slavery, as well as the Iberian theories of empire and colonial authority across the Iberian globe in the sixteenth and seventeen ..read more
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