Unjust Deserts
Times Literary Supplement
by george.berridge@the-tls.co.uk
1d ago
This week, George Berridge is at the theatre to see Brian Cox in a classic role and Toby Lichtig considers a literary scandal with tragic consequences. The post Unjust Deserts appeared first on TLS ..read more
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Classicist on trial
Times Literary Supplement
by lily.herd@the-tls.co.uk
1d ago
An elderly classicist, now over eighty, is about to go on trial in Italy for defaming the Prime Minister, Giorgia Meloni. The classicist is Luciano Canfora, a leading philologist and ancient historian, who has been influential in many aspects of the subject. He has written on the Alexandrian Library, on Julius Caesar and on much more, and he is a distinguished and dogged member of the academic awkward squad. If you want a sense of his doggedness, take a look at his many articles and books trying to show that the recently rediscovered Artemidorus Papyrus (purportedly a text of an ancient geogra ..read more
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Walter Pater
Times Literary Supplement
by simonwnewsuk1902
2d ago
“It is not what Pater says but how he says it that both secures his place in critical history and marginalizes him in the discipline of English”, writes Kate Hext (March 29) in her robust review of Walter Pater and the Beginnings of English Studies (edited by Charles Martindale, Lene Østermark-Johansen and Elizabeth Prettejohn). I took down Richard Aldington’s The Religion of Beauty (1950) to see whether Aldington was of the same view. Hext says that Pater was “concerned with the style and form of nonfiction, and its place in the world”. Aldington says the “present disfavour clouding Pater’s f ..read more
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Resilient rivers
Times Literary Supplement
by simonwnewsuk1902
2d ago
For months now, it has seemed that the dirtiest four-letter word a writer could utter was “Gaza”. When Jason Allen-Paisant won the T. S. Eliot prize, for instance, he spoke out against “the killing, the genocide” – but, as we reported (January 26), the press couldn’t quite summon up the energy to listen. But fear of the G-word is a strange phenomenon, and far from universal – see notable contributions to the TLS, for example, by the Israeli Ari Shavit (November 10, 2023) and the Egyptian Ahdaf Soueif (January 12). We rehearse this history of cold feet to set in its proper context a more recent ..read more
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Fables of freedom
Times Literary Supplement
by simonwnewsuk1902
2d ago
“Napoleon is dead”, wrote Stendhal in 1824, “but a new conqueror has already shown himself to the world, and from Moscow to Naples, from London to Vienna, from Paris to Calcutta, his name is constantly on every tongue.” Stendhal was referring to Gioachino Rossini, still celebrated in every opera house around the world today. He was only thirty-seven years old in 1829, when he composed Guillaume Tell for the Paris Opera, his thirty-ninth opera and his last, though he lived for another four decades. Composed to a French libretto in the style of French grand opera, based on Friedrich Schiller’s p ..read more
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Crossword 1522
Times Literary Supplement
by george.berridge@the-tls.co.uk
2d ago
A PDF of this crossword can be found here The post Crossword 1522 appeared first on TLS ..read more
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Stone soup
Times Literary Supplement
by simonwnewsuk1902
2d ago
“Peasant” has a strange ring to English ears. No one today calls themselves one, and as an insult it sounds like an affected anachronism. “Peasant” evokes little of either the pride or the shame attached to paysan, paesano or chłop in French, Italian or Polish. Nor is it common in the writings of recent historians, anthropologists and folklorists, who have long since retreated from the “modernization theory” that pitted peasants against nation states, mass education and industrial fertilizer. Remembering Peasants is about the immense gap left by this unfashionable category. In barely more than ..read more
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In this week’s TLS
Times Literary Supplement
by george.berridge@the-tls.co.uk
2d ago
Canto IV of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage prophesied Byron’s immortality: But I have lived, and have not lived in vain: My mind may lose its force, my blood its fire, And my frame perish even in conquering pain, But there is that within me which shall tire Torture and Time, and breathe when I expire. Before his death at Missolonghi, murdered by quack doctors while fighting for the cause of Greek independence, Byron foresaw that flocks of bio­graphers would feast on his zestful, romantic life – “I flatter myself I shall have more than one”, he said knowingly. Corin Throsby reviews two more studi ..read more
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Suicide of empires
Times Literary Supplement
by simonwnewsuk1902
2d ago
In 1931 Winston Churchill called his history of the eastern front The Unknown War. In many respects it was. That was partly for linguistic reasons and partly for political. The Russian memoirs that appeared in English, French or German were written by exiles who had fled the revolution. The studies published in the Soviet Union treated the war as the imperialist precursor to the Bolshevik seizure of power. In 1975 Norman Stone, in a book with the same title as Nick Lloyd’s, focused on Russia and ended his account in 1917. He said as much about the war’s social and economic dimensions as its mi ..read more
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Bad at being baddies
Times Literary Supplement
by lily.herd@the-tls.co.uk
2d ago
In the early 1970s Steve McQueen was the biggest action star in America. But on November 24, 1971, he was eclipsed by a man called Dan Cooper. At least, that’s the name he was going by. No one knew his real identity. On that rainy Wednesday in Portland, Oregon, Cooper walked into the city’s airport and bought a one-way ticket to Seattle, Washington. He didn’t draw attention to himself. With his short hair, clean shave, black suit and briefcase, he looked like an average businessman. After take-off he gave a stewardess a note that read: “Miss – I have a bomb here”. He unlocked his briefcase; th ..read more
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