Philosophy on the move
by
18h ago
 563.  Culture of violence.   Cantor (1993) proposed that the crusades, in 1095, 1144, 1190, and 1204, and the Spanish reconquest against the Moors,  with the large defeat of them in 1212, created a sense of ‘virtuous militarism’, that took hold of European culture. In its beginning, it manifested itself in heroic knighthood, in armour on horseback, conducting josting tournaments, in the 12th-13th century.   Cantor (p. 301) claimed that all this inspired the voyages of ‘discovery’ and the imperialism of the European countries (Portugal, Spain, The Netherlands, England ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
1w ago
 562 high and low context In studies of communication, Eduard Hall (1967) made a distinction between ‘low context’ communication with precise, explicit, logical, coherent use of words, and ‘high context’ communication, which is ambiguous, context-dependent, using body language, expression, relying on trust, and aimed at maintaining the relation concerned (Ramos, 2014). What is the relation with other insights from theories of communication and language? Buber’s ‘Ich-Du’ relations and Rosa’s ‘resonance’, discussed in earlier items in this blog, require ‘high context’ communication. There a ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
1w ago
  561. Our culture makes young people mad My daughter Anouk, a high school teacher , commented on this piece There are reports that a growing number of people, especially young people, are suffering from psychological problems, with an increasing number of suicides. There are indications that this is associated with the obsessive use of social media, in a form of addiction, where children spend absurd amounts of time, going to great lengths to compete on building profiles that are more glamourous than those of others, to the point of yielding nude photos to lecherous men who then use them ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
3w ago
 560. Realist and idealist   I am astonished to see that in philosophy the old debate still rages between realism and idealism. In my view, this is just superseded confusion. The realist and idealist are both right and wrong, or both half right. Here comes what I have been arguing for a long time, also in this blog.   As the idealist says, we form our observations and perceptions according to more or less anchored forms of thought. On the other hand, those ideas develop in interaction with the world. Thus, reality is somehow woven into our ideas. Those ideas must be adequate to ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
1M ago
 559. From gold to copper   According to a classic ethical injunction, often attributed to the18-th century philosopher Kant but much older, one should (not) do to anyone what one would (not) like to be done to oneself, It is called ‘the ‘Golden Rule’. Yong (2005) changed this into what he called ‘the Copper Rule’, which says that one should do to the other what he would want to be done. I am happy with this. I have always thought that the Golden Rule was too self-centred. I would not be pleased to receive tickets for a soccer match, but I know people who would be delighted with them ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
1M ago
 558. Betrayal in academia.   More than twenty years ago, I experienced the following betrayal in Academia.   At a given university, I was asked to set up a research institute cum Phd school, in collaboration between the faculties of Business and Economics. I was so naïve as to accept the assignment, seeing bridgeheads between the two disciplines. There was much at stake, because if it did not succeed, we would lose substantial funds for research.   The bridgeheads I saw lay in non-orthodox economics of institutions and evolutionary economics. Unfortunately, those research ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
1M ago
 557. Three gems from medieval history Here I share with you three gems that I delved from ‘The civilisation of the Middle Ages’ by Norman F. Cantor (1993 edition). The first gem is an explanation of why the ancient Romans produced so little technical progress. The explanation offered by Cantor is this. The Romans  had an abundant supply of slaves that could do all menial jobs and handicraft needed, which made labour so cheap, that there was no incentive to produce labour-saving innovation. Interesting view: slavery slows innovation. The second gem is an explanation of why the Arabs ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
2M ago
 556. Decline of civilisations   Generally, the decline of civilisations is faster than their laborious rise. This is called the ‘Seneca effect’, after the Roman philosopher, who said something in that vein. (Bardi, 2020).But every decline is unique, gradual or short and calamitous. The decline of the Roman empire lasted two hundred of the thousand years of the empire, but it was gradual. There were several causes. One was the loss of martial spirit and the sense of civic responsibility that was strong in the Roman republic, since people were later more inclined to savour the fruits ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
2M ago
 Blog 555. Between subjugation and authenticity   One of the problems in human life is to find a way between subjugation to the powers that be, institutions, and authenticity. Michel Foucault showed how people have to submit to authority in, prisons, clinics and scientific communities, to discipline even if they are victims of it. Such subjugation occurs in all organisations. There has to be a shared mission, ways of conflict resolution, reporting procedures and handbooks to achieve a goal. That seems to leave no room for authenticity. Michel Foucault despaired, and  could not s ..read more
Visit website
Philosophy on the move
by
3M ago
 554. The freedom of vagueness   Ambiguity and vagueness are not synonyms ( Solan & Tiersma, 2012). In ambiguity there are many specific manifestations of a general concept, such as many examples of ‘cat’, including my cat who shreds my furniture and speaks to me, and it is not clear which is at issue. The context offers disambiguation In vagueness there are dubious boundary cases. Lions and tigers are clearly not cats, but a lynx might be a dubious case   Vagueness may be a bother, but it allows for boundary cases that permit some deviation from a norm, satisfying it partly ..read more
Visit website

Follow Philosophy on the move on Feedspot

Continue with Google
OR