Sharing 3D Printing with Kids
Hackaday
by Al Williams
3m ago
If you have a hobby, it is natural to want to share it with kids. If you are interested in 3D printing, you may even have kids who want to try their hand at printing without prompting. There are a number of “kid printers” aimed specifically at that market. Are they worthwhile? How old is old enough? [Everson Siqueirar] tries out a Kidoodle with this 6-year-old daughter, and the results are good, as you can see in the video below. Impressively, his daughter [Sophie] was able to set up the printer with a little help. The build plate is very small and not heated. Apparently, a glue stick is nece ..read more
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Low-Cost Cryocooler Pumps Out Cheap DIY Liquid Nitrogen
Hackaday
by Dan Maloney
6h ago
A word of caution if you’re planning to try this cryocooler method for making liquid nitrogen: not only does it involve toxic and flammable gasses and pressures high enough to turn the works into a bomb, but you’re likely to deplete your rent account with money you’ll shell out for all the copper tubing and fittings. You’ve been warned. In theory, making liquid nitrogen should be as easy as getting something cold enough that nitrogen in the air condenses. The “cold enough” part is the trick, and it’s where [Hyperspace Pirate]’s cryocooler expertise comes into play. His setup uses recycled com ..read more
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How the Bell System Was Built
Hackaday
by Al Williams
10h ago
We’ve often thought that while going to the moon in the 1960s was audacious, it was just the flashiest of many audacious feats attempted and accomplished in the 20th century. Imagine, for a minute, that the phone system didn’t exist today, and you stood up in front of a corporate board and said, “Let’s run copper wire to every home and business in the world.” They’d probably send you for a psychiatric evaluation. Yet we did just that, and, in the United States, that copper wire was because of the Bell system, which [Brian Potter] describes in a recent post. The Bell company, regardless of man ..read more
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Congratulations to the 2024 Business Card Challenge Winners!
Hackaday
by Elliot Williams
10h ago
When you ask a Hackaday crowd to design a business card, you should expect to be surprised by what you get. But still, we were surprised by the breadth of entries! Our judges wracked their brains to pick their top ten, and then we compared notes, and three projects rose to the top, but honestly the top ten could have all won. It was a tight field. But only three of the entries get to take home the $150 DigiKey gift certificates, so without further ado…   Blinkencard – Pocket Altair 8800 [ajlitt] built a full retrocomputer, and a slick looking one to boot, in the size of a business car ..read more
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Reverse-Engineering a Shahed-136 Drone Air Data Computer
Hackaday
by Maya Posch
11h ago
Top of the air data computer module, with pressure sensors, RS232 driver and DC-DC converter visible. (Credit: Le Labo de Michel, YouTube) An air data computer (ADC) is a crucial part of an avionics package that can calculate the altitude, vertical speed, air speed and more from pressure (via pitot tubes) and temperature inputs. When your airplane is a one-way attack drone like Iran’s Shahed-136, you obviously need an ADC as well, but have to focus on making it both cheap and circumvent a myriad of sanctions. As [Michel] recently found out while reverse-engineering one of these ADCs. Courtesy ..read more
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Nitric Acid Is The Hot New Way To Pick Locks
Hackaday
by Lewin Day
14h ago
Lockpicking is a grand skill to have, and one that’s often presumed to be one of the dark arts of the burglar. However, a new technique has come to the fore in some European contexts. It appears nitric acid is being used to damage locks to allow criminals to gain entry into residential premises. Germany’s Bild has covered this matter, as has Feuerwehr Magazine. The technique has apparently come to prominence in the last couple of years. Attackers pour the corrosive liquid into the keyway of a typical door lock. This damages the cylinder, and perhaps the pins inside as well. Once the meta ..read more
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Keebin’ with Kristina: the One with the 24-Hour Macro Pad
Hackaday
by Kristina Panos
15h ago
They say Rome wasn’t built in a day, but this great little music-controlling macro pad by [nibbler] actually was. Why? Because as Hackaday’s own [Donald Papp] reminded us, we all need a win sometimes, especially as projects drag on and on without any end in sight. Image by [nibbler] via Toxic AntidoteAs [nibbler] points out, what really constitutes a win? Set the bar too low and it won’t feel like one at all. Too high, and you may become too discouraged to cross the finish line. With that in mind, [nibbler] set the bar differently, limiting themselves to what could be done in the one day per ..read more
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Linksys Velop Routers Caught Sending WiFi Creds in the Clear
Hackaday
by Tom Nardi
18h ago
A troubling report from the Belgian consumer protection group Testaankoop: several models of Velop Pro routers from Linksys were found to be sending WiFi configuration data out to a remote server during the setup process. That would be bad enough, but not only are these routers reporting private information to the mothership, they are doing it in clear text for anyone to listen in on. Testaankoop says that while testing out the Pro WiFi 6E and Pro 7 versions of Velop routers, they discovered that unencrypted packets were being sent to a server hosted by Amazon Web Services (AWS). In these pac ..read more
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Simple Version of Pong Played On a Row of LEDs
Hackaday
by Tom Nardi
22h ago
As far as video games go, Pong is already about as simple as it gets. But if even two dimensions is a bit more than you’re looking to tackle, [mircemk] shows how you can distill the core gameplay of this iconic title to its absolute minimum using an Arduino and a row of LEDs. While [mircemk] brings their usual design aesthetic and flash to the project, this one could truly be done as a parts bin build. All you really need is a microcontroller with enough I/O pins (here, an Arduino Nano is used), a couple of buttons, and the aforementioned LEDs. A 16×2 LCD and a buzzer have been added to impro ..read more
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A 64-bit x86 Bootloader from Scratch
Hackaday
by Al Williams
1d ago
For most people, you turn on your computer, and it starts the operating system. However, the reality is much more complex as [Thasso] discovered. Even modern x86 chips start in 16-bit real mode and there is a bit of fancy footwork required to shift to modern protected mode with full 64-bit support. Want to see how? [Thasso] shows us the ropes. Nowadays, it is handy to develop such things because you don’t have to use real hardware. An emulator like QEMU will suffice. If you know assembly language, the process is surprisingly simple, although there is a lot of nuance and subtlety. The biggest ..read more
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