Understanding fatal landslides at global scales
Eos Magazine
by Dave Petley
54m ago
The Landslide Blog is written by Dave Petley, who is widely recognized as a world leader in the study and management of landslides. Over a long period of time, I collected data on landslides that kill people around the world – work that started on a whim but became very interesting. My two most cited papers are on this topic. Due to the pressures of my leadership career, I stopped this data collection in 2016, although I have no restarted and am collecting data for 2024 that is already proving to be interesting. But work continues on our original dataset, especially in combination with other ..read more
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Volcanic Lightning May Have Retooled the Nitrogen Needed for Life
Eos Magazine
by Carolyn Wilke
3d ago
Volcanoes belched the gases that formed Earth’s atmosphere. Those volcanoes could have also spurred lightning that fixed nitrogen, freeing it from nitrogen gas to form nitrogen-containing molecules that living things can use. And scientists have now found proof in the geological record. On Earth, nitrogen primarily comes in the form of two atoms bonded together, or N2. “It’s very strongly bonded,” said Erwan Martin, a geochemist and volcanologist at Sorbonne University in Paris. Some organisms can break this bond and fix nitrogen. But nitrogen fixation was needed to form the building blocks f ..read more
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Measuring and Modeling Methane Emissions in Wetlands
Eos Magazine
by Aaron Sidder
3d ago
Source: Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences Global atmospheric methane concentrations have risen steadily since 2006. Growth in agriculture, transportation, and industry are partly to blame, but so too is the rise in biogenic emissions, or emissions from natural sources. Biogenic sources are as varied and complex as the ecosystems from which they derive—recent work highlighted tree stems as one overlooked emitter—but wetlands stand out as the largest natural methane contributor. In fact, they account for about a third of total methane emissions, natural or otherwise. But understand ..read more
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Challenges and Prospects for Modeling Lake Water Temperature in a Changing Climate
Eos Magazine
by Sebastiano Piccolroaz, Senlin Zhu, Robert Ladwig, Laura Carrea, Samantha Oliver, Adam P. Piotrowski, Mariusz Ptak, Ryuichiro Shinohara, Mariusz Sojka, Richard I. Woolway and David Z. Zhu
3d ago
Editors’ Vox is a blog from AGU’s Publications Department. Lakes are a fundamental component of the hydrosphere and store about 87% of the Earth’s liquid surface freshwater resources. The temperature dynamics within lakes are important to understand and model, especially as climate change progresses, since they shape mixing processes and the health of aquatic ecosystems. A new article in Reviews of Geophysics explores the different components and techniques used in lake water temperature modeling. We asked the authors to give an overview of lake temperature dynamics, the successes and challeng ..read more
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Challenges in Measuring Aerosol Cloud-Mediated Radiative Forcing
Eos Magazine
by Daniel Rosenfeld, Alexander Kokhanovsky, Tom Goren, Edward Gryspeerdt, Otto Hasekamp, Hailing Jia, Anton Lopatin, Johannes Quaas, Zengxin Pan and Odran Sourdeval
4d ago
Editors’ Vox is a blog from AGU’s Publications Department. Aerosols are small airborne liquid or solid particles, originating from natural sources such as dust, sea spray, and biological particles, or anthropogenic sources such as smoke and other particulate emissions. These particles serve as the basis for the formation of clouds, and thus have a significant impact on Earth’s climate and energy budget. A new article in Reviews of Geophysics explores the ways that scientists study aerosols and their effects from space. We asked the authors to give an overview of aerosols, how satellites are us ..read more
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New Insights on Atmospheric Waves from the Hunga Volcanic Eruption
Eos Magazine
by William J. Randel
4d ago
Editors’ Highlights are summaries of recent papers by AGU’s journal editors. Source: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres The Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcanic eruption in January 2022 was the most explosive eruption of the past several decades. Global-scale atmospheric waves were identified early after the eruption using full-Earth geostationary images (with 10- or 15-minute cadence), including a large amplitude Lamb wave which circled the Earth several times (e.g. Wright et al., 2022). In a new study, Horváth et al. [2024] use higher resolution mesoscale (about 1,000 kilometers) geo ..read more
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Last Chance Lake Harbors the Highest Known Levels of Phosphate
Eos Magazine
by Katherine Kornei
4d ago
Life’s first toehold on Earth was likely in a watery place, and it might have looked something like Last Chance Lake. New research reveals that the small body of water in Canada exhibits the highest known natural levels of phosphate, a compound critical to the formation of RNA in the absence of enzymes. Natural concentrations of phosphate are typically orders of magnitude too low to support that process, but Last Chance Lake—and others like it—circumvents that problem because of its unique biogeochemistry, the researchers suggested. Last Chance Lake is a shallow, murky lake in southern Britis ..read more
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Reactivating ancient landslides through reservoir construction – the Hoseynabad-e Kalpush landslide in Iran
Eos Magazine
by Dave Petley
4d ago
The Landslide Blog is written by Dave Petley, who is widely recognized as a world leader in the study and management of landslides. A known potential issue with the construction of reservoirs is the reactivation of ancient landslides that have lain dormant in the landscape. There are literally hundreds of documented examples, but as dam construction continues at a high pace, this problem continues to recur. There is a very good example described and analysed in a recent edition of the journal Engineering Geology (Vassileva et al. 2023 – available open access). This focuses on a very interest ..read more
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Introducing the new Editor-in-Chief of JGR: Solid Earth
Eos Magazine
by Alexandre Schubnel
5d ago
Editors’ Vox is a blog from AGU’s Publications Department. We are delighted to share that Alexandre Schubnel has just taken over as the Editor-in-Chief of JGR: Solid Earth. We asked him some questions about his own research interests and his vision for the journal. What are your own areas of scientific interest? My scientific interests are in rock physics, with a particular focus on earthquake source physics and mechanics. In the past few years, I have been particularly fascinated with the role that minerals play in earthquake faulting—how they can trigger rupture and contribute to frictional ..read more
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Reflecting on 4 Years at the helm of JGR: Solid Earth
Eos Magazine
by Isabelle Manighetti
5d ago
Editors’ Vox is a blog from AGU’s Publications Department. When I was offered to lead the journal as its Editor-in-Chief, I felt tremendously honored, proud, and thankful. JGR: Solid Earth is one of the most prestigious journals in solid Earth geophysics, renowned for the high quality of its peer-reviews and publications, and the strong impact of its papers. Thus, when I was offered to lead the journal as its Editor-in-Chief, I felt tremendously honored, proud, and thankful. I also felt intimidated as I was following a century of editorship by prestigious male colleagues. But more, I was a b ..read more
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