In Adelaide they’re trying to build a deep learning machine that can reason
Cosmos Magazine
by Jamie Seidel
3h ago
Large Language Models burst onto the scene a little over a year ago and transformed everything, and yet it’s already facing a fork in the road….more of the same or does it venture into what is being called “deep learning?” Professor Simon Lucey, the Director of the Adelaide-based Australian Institute for Machine Learning believes that path will lead to “augmented reasoning.” It’s a new and emerging field of AI that combines the ability of computers to recognise patterns through traditional machine learning, with the ability to reason and learn from prior information and human interaction. Mac ..read more
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Turning off a gene in potatoes creates potato chips with less carcinogens
Cosmos Magazine
by Jacinta Bowler
10h ago
While you might not think about the intricacies of cold-storage while enjoying a packet of chips, a new study has brought the darkest chips into the spotlight. Researchers in the US have created a genetically modified chip that doesn’t darken as easily – if successful this would minimise waste for the spud industry and limit a potential carcinogen from ending up in your snack. “This discovery represents a significant advance in our understanding of potato development and its implications for food quality and health,” said Michigan State University professor Jiming Jiang. “It has the potential ..read more
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Risk and reward: Can Australia thrive in the AI era?
Cosmos Magazine
by Petra Stock
13h ago
A leading researcher says the pace of development in artificial intelligence should be a “wake-up call” for Australian governments and media organisations. Professor Simon Lucey, director of the Australian Institute for Machine Learning (AIML) at the University of Adelaide, says generative AI images and video are already so advanced, it’s becoming more and more challenging to tell real from fake content. Lucey says he is pleased with the language around responsible AI from the Federal Government, and the establishment of a new AI expert group, but wants to see Australia develop its own AI cap ..read more
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Rare fractions of electron charge seen in graphene
Cosmos Magazine
by Evrim Yazgin
17h ago
In rare cases, electrons can show a fraction of their usual charge. It’s an effect that’s only been seen a handful of times – now physicists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have seen it in graphene. And it could prove useful in technologies such as quantum computing. Electrons have a single negative charge, equal and opposite to the positive charge of the proton. But it’s not that simple, as it turns out. Electrons can also have a “fractional charge.” Physicists call this the “fractional quantum Hall effect.” It is usually seen in very high, carefully maintained magnetic fi ..read more
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Dolphin which imprisoned fish 22 million years ago found in New Zealand
Cosmos Magazine
by Evrim Yazgin
17h ago
A newly discovered prehistoric dolphin appears to have had a unique method for catching its prey. Aureia rerehua was found in the Hakataramea Valley in the South Canterbury region of New Zealand’s south island. It was uncovered in a limestone quarry in a layer of sediment that dates to 22–23 million years ago (mya). It is described in a paper published in the Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand. This places the newly discovered dolphin species right on the temporal boundary between the Oligocene epoch (34–23 mya) and the Miocene (23–5.3 mya). This period of Earth’s history was warmer ..read more
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How to repair a satellite while it’s in orbit
Cosmos Magazine
by Jacinta Bowler
20h ago
Imagine spending years and hundreds of thousands of dollars on building a satellite, and then tens of thousands of dollars to send it up to space, only for it to suddenly break down hundreds of kilometres above the Earth, with no way to fix it. This is not just a hypothetical. About 50% of cubesats (mini satellites usually launched by universities and researchers) fail. So, researchers are trying to design what seems almost impossible – robots that can gently repair satellites while both are still in orbit. “Satellites, when they are operating in orbit, are not like a car – we can’t serv ..read more
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The Australian Institute which is trying to tame the AI beast
Cosmos Magazine
by Jamie Seidel
1d ago
“Modern AI is amazing,” says Simon Lucey. “It’s something to behold. Nobody thought they could scale to the heights they are at. But – at the end of the day – they’re still glorified ‘if-this-then-that’ machines.” It’s an honest appraisal from the director of the Australian Institute for Machine Learning (AIML) and professor in the University of Adelaide’s School of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, who lists his interests as computer vision, machine learning, and robotics. “It’s a technology based on brute force,” he told Cosmos. AIML is Australia’s first institute dedicated to resear ..read more
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IM-1 ‘Odysseus’ lander on track to Moon landing on Friday morning
Cosmos Magazine
by Matthew Ward Agius
1d ago
Intuitive Machines is poised to undertake its Moon landing at the end of this week, with its journey to the lunar surface proceeding without major issue. The ‘Odysseus’ Nova-C lander can start its landing procedures from 9.49am AEDT Friday 23 February (5.49pm USET Thursday 22 February). It’s scheduled to land near the Malapert A crater in the Moon’s southern polar region. Odysseus has performed a series of engine manoeuvres since its launch from the Kennedy Space Centre last week. Two engine commissioning and trajectory correction manoeuvres (TCM) have been performed so far, each lasting les ..read more
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Experience the White Continent: A scientific expedition with Scenic and Cosmos
Cosmos Magazine
by Cosmos Studio
1d ago
Visiting Antarctica is a journey into the heart of scientific exploration and environmental stewardship. But the continent’s importance as a place set aside for scientific study isn’t just about understanding the past and present; it’s also about shaping the future. Antarctica visitors have the privilege of connecting with this heritage, and of gaining a profound appreciation of the need to protect this extraordinary and fragile place. Travelling aboard the magnificent Scenic Eclipse, Ian and Gail will cast off from Ushuaia, Argentina, for an unforgettable 11-day voyage to the Antarctic Penin ..read more
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State science chiefs are joining the dots
Cosmos Magazine
by Petra Stock
1d ago
Meet the Chiefs is an occasional series by Petra Stock. She previously covered the role of CSIRO Chief Scientist. While Professor Peter Klinken describes his role as akin to consultant adviser, to Western Australia’s premier he’s the ‘thinker in residence’. On any issue requiring a scientific lens, Klinken – WA’s chief scientist – gathers the evidence and takes out the “geek speak” before presenting it to policy makers.  That might be a response to a question from a minister, or a problem or opportunity he thinks important to flag. The issues are as diverse as the energy transition ..read more
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