Strategies For Bringing ‘Desirable Difficulty’ Into Learning
KQED | MindShift
by MindShift
5d ago
Excerpted from What Teachers Need to Know About Memory by Jonathan Firth and Nasima Riazat. Copyright (c) 2024 by Corwin Press, Inc. All rights reserved. Some of the most effective learning strategies are those known as desirable difficulties. These make learning more effortful but are useful (desirable) because they make forgetting less likely, and help to ensure that what is practiced is both retained and can be used flexibly in the future. However, could it be the case that for some learners, there are already enough difficulties in the classroom, without adding more? After all, the le ..read more
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Iowa Superintendent and Former Olympian Bested in Footrace by 5th-Grader
KQED | MindShift
by Kara Newhouse
5d ago
It seemed like it should be an easy win for Des Moines Superintendent Ian Roberts to dust off his racing shoes and compete against a team of elementary schoolers. The 47-year-old Guyanese runner’s skills had taken him around the globe, after all, even competing in the 2000 Summer Olympic Games in Sydney. “I showed up to the school, and I’m waiting there. And I saw the principal and teachers and they brought the entire school out to the track. And I’m thinking, ‘oh,'” Roberts recalled with a laugh. What was initially going to be a race between Roberts and Everett Clark, a lucky second-grader wh ..read more
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These teens were missing too much school. Here’s what it took to get them back
KQED | MindShift
by Kara Newhouse
1w ago
Sophomore Neomi sits quietly in an office at her high school in a Colorado mountain town west of Denver. It’s a cold December morning and she’s wearing gold and black Nikes and a gray hoodie, pulled up. She’s surrounded by school staff and her mom. “I just wanna be really clear about the intention of this meeting. It’s not to make you feel bad,” says Dave, a school administrator. “What’s going on?” he asks Neomi. “Why aren’t we coming to school? Because you were coming to school quite a bit, and then all of a sudden…” As Neomi listens, tears roll down her cheeks. “Do you not feel safe? Are you ..read more
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Why Children with Disabilities Are Missing School and Losing Skills
KQED | MindShift
by Kara Newhouse
1w ago
On a recent school day in Del Norte County, Calif., in one of the state’s northernmost school districts, 17-year-old Emma Lenover sits at home on the couch. In some ways, Emma is a typical teen. She loves Disneyland and dance class. But she has already faced more adversity than some classmates will in a lifetime. “All of October and all of November, there was no school because there was no aide,” says Emma’s mother, Melony Lenover, leaning her elbows into the kitchen table. Emma has multiple health conditions, including cerebral palsy. She uses a wheelchair, a feeding tube and is nonverbal. To ..read more
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How Schools Can Better Support Teachers of Newcomer Students
KQED | MindShift
by Marlena Jackson-Retondo
1w ago
Every year, K-12 schools across the country welcome hundreds of thousands of newcomers – foreign-born students who have migrated, are seeking asylum, are refugees, are undocumented or are unaccompanied – into their classrooms. Among the multitude of challenges that these students face is entering a completely new education system, often in a language that is unfamiliar. But the strain is also felt by teachers both in general education and English language acquisition classrooms.  Newcomer students in today’s global context present “nuances that make it particularly important for the educa ..read more
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Want To Protect Your Kids’ Eyes from Myopia? Get Them To Play Outside
KQED | MindShift
by Kara Newhouse
1w ago
If you’re a parent struggling to get your kids’ off their devices and outdoors to play, here’s another reason to keep trying: Spending at least two hours outside each day is one of the most important things your kids can do to protect their eyesight. “We think that outdoor time is the best form of prevention for nearsightedness,” says Dr. Noha Ekdawi, a pediatric ophthalmologist in Wheaton, Ill. And that’s important, because the number of kids with nearsightedness – or myopia – has been growing rapidly in the U.S., and in many other parts of the world. In the U.S., 42% of people are now myopic ..read more
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Tracing Black-White Achievement Gaps Since the Brown v. Board Decision
KQED | MindShift
by Kara Newhouse
1w ago
Last week, I wrote about trends in school segregation in the 70 years since the Supreme Court’s landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision that declared racial segregation in schools unconstitutional. That data showed considerable progress in integrating schools but also some steps backward, especially since the 1990s in the nation’s biggest cities. We should care about this troubling shift because many researchers say that children learn best in integrated classrooms. That’s why I also wanted to trace the data on academic achievement over the same time period. Unfortunately, we don’t have ..read more
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Why Writing by Hand Beats Typing for Thinking and Learning
KQED | MindShift
by Kara Newhouse
1w ago
If you’re like many digitally savvy Americans, it has likely been a while since you’ve spent much time writing by hand. The laborious process of tracing out our thoughts, letter by letter, on the page is becoming a relic of the past in our screen-dominated world, where text messages and thumb-typed grocery lists have replaced handwritten letters and sticky notes. Electronic keyboards offer obvious efficiency benefits that have undoubtedly boosted our productivity — imagine having to write all your emails longhand. To keep up, many schools are introducing computers as early as preschool, meanin ..read more
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High School Math Can Be Playful, Too
KQED | MindShift
by Marlena Jackson-Retondo
2w ago
When students reach high school math, play typically disappears from the curriculum. But Kathy Sun is discovering new ways to bring play into high school math.  A student’s math identity is usually focused on procedural proficiency rather than a broader view of mathematical contributions and community, said Sun, a researcher and professor at Santa Clara University. Playfully engaging students in math concepts is not just a fun teaching strategy, but gets at the core of deepening mathematical understanding and connections, she continued. Dan Finkel, a math curriculum writer and former math ..read more
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5 Takeaways on School Segregation 70 Years After Brown v. Board
KQED | MindShift
by Kara Newhouse
2w ago
It was one of the most significant days in the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. On May 17, 1954, the nine justices unanimously ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that schools segregated by race did not provide an equal education. Students could no longer be barred from a school because of the color of their skin. To commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Brown decision, I wanted to look at how far we’ve come in integrating our schools and how far we still have to go.  Two sociologists, Sean Reardon at Stanford University and Ann Owens at the University of Southern California, have te ..read more
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