Crossword answers revealed
MIT Technology Review
by Peter Gordon ’88
8h ago
Give up? Here’s the solution to the May/June 2024 crossword puzzle “Not that MIT ..read more
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The Download: the problem with police bodycams, and how to make useful robots
MIT Technology Review
by Rhiannon Williams
14h ago
This is today’s edition of The Download, our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what’s going on in the world of technology AI was supposed to make police bodycams better. What happened? When police departments first started buying and deploying bodycams in the wake of the police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, a decade ago, activists hoped it would bring about real change. Years later, despite what’s become a multibillion-dollar market for these devices, the tech is far from a panacea. Most of the vast reams of footage they generate go unwatched.  O ..read more
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Three reasons robots are about to become more way useful 
MIT Technology Review
by Melissa Heikkilä
14h ago
This story originally appeared in The Algorithm, our weekly newsletter on AI. To get stories like this in your inbox first, sign up here. The holy grail of robotics since the field’s beginning has been to build a robot that can do our housework. But for a long time, that has just been a dream. While roboticists have been able to get robots to do impressive things in the lab, such as parkour, this usually requires meticulous planning in a tightly-controlled setting. This makes it hard for robots to work reliably in homes around children and pets, homes have wildly varying floorplans, and contai ..read more
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AI was supposed to make police bodycams better. What happened?
MIT Technology Review
by Patrick Sisson
14h ago
On July 25 last year, in circuit court in Dane County, Wisconsin, a motion was filed to dismiss a criminal case as a result of what defense attorneys described as “institutional bad-faith actions” by a local police department. The evidence was unearthed, in part, because of artificial intelligence.  Attorney Jessa Nicholson Goetz had been preparing to defend her client against a sexual assault charge that arose from a 2021 Tinder date. During pretrial motions, Nicholson Goetz’s co-counsel noticed discrepancies around how the lead police investigator was discussing and documenting his use ..read more
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The Download: saving Louisiana from sinking, and the promise of thermal batteries
MIT Technology Review
by Rhiannon Williams
2d ago
This is today’s edition of The Download, our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what’s going on in the world of technology. How to stop a state from sinking In a 10-month span between 2020 and 2021, southwest Louisiana saw five climate-related disasters, including two destructive hurricanes. As if that wasn’t bad enough, more storms are coming, and many areas are not prepared. But some government officials and state engineers are hoping there is an alternative: elevation. The $6.8 billion Southwest Coastal Louisiana Project is betting that raising residences by a few f ..read more
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How thermal batteries are heating up energy storage
MIT Technology Review
by Casey Crownhart
2d ago
We need heat to make everything from steel bars to ketchup packets. Today, a whopping 20% of global energy demand goes to producing heat used in industry, and most of that heat is generated by burning fossil fuels. In an effort to clean up industry, a growing number of companies are working to supply that heat with a technology called thermal batteries. It’s such an exciting idea that MIT Technology Review readers have officially selected thermal batteries as the reader’s choice addition to our 2024 list of 10 Breakthrough Technologies. So here’s a closer look at what all the excitement is abo ..read more
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How to stop a state from sinking
MIT Technology Review
by Xander Peters
2d ago
There is more than one way to raise a house.  Many of the mobile homes, Creole cottages, and other dwellings that have been flagged for flood risk along Louisiana’s low-lying coastline can be separated from their foundations and slowly raised into the sky on hydraulic jacks. While a home is held aloft by temporary support beams, a new, elevated floor is built underneath or the foundation extended upward—think of the pilings you might see supporting a beach house.  But for homes like Christa and Alex Bell’s, which consists of two stories and a two-car garage sitting on a concrete slab ..read more
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The Download: a history of brainwashing, and America’s chipmaking ambitions
MIT Technology Review
by Rhiannon Williams
5d ago
This is today’s edition of The Download, our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what’s going on in the world of technology A brief, weird history of brainwashing On a spring day in 1959, war correspondent Edward Hunter testified before a US Senate subcommittee investigating “the effect of Red China Communes on the United States.” Hunter discussed a new concept to the American public: a supposedly scientific system for changing people’s minds, even making them love things they once hated. Much of it was baseless, but Hunter’s sensational tales still became an important p ..read more
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The effort to make a breakthrough cancer therapy cheaper
MIT Technology Review
by Cassandra Willyard
5d ago
This article first appeared in The Checkup, MIT Technology Review’s weekly biotech newsletter. To receive it in your inbox every Thursday, and read articles like this first, sign up here.  CAR-T therapies, created by engineering a patient’s own cells to fight cancer, are typically reserved for people who have exhausted other treatment options. But last week, the FDA approved Carvykti, a CAR-T product for multiple myeloma, as a second-line therapy. That means people are eligible to receive Carvykti after their first relapse. While this means some multiple myeloma patients in ..read more
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A brief, weird history of brainwashing
MIT Technology Review
by Annalee Newitz
5d ago
On an early spring day in 1959, Edward Hunter testified before a US Senate subcommittee investigating “the effect of Red China Communes on the United States.” It was the kind of opportunity he relished. A war correspondent who had spent considerable time in Asia, Hunter had achieved brief media stardom in 1951 after his book Brain-Washing in Red China introduced a new concept to the American public: a supposedly scientific system for changing people’s minds, even making them love things they once hated.  But Hunter wasn’t just a reporter, objectively chronicling conditions in China. As he ..read more
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