Redeeming Love Does a Disservice to Hosea and to Women
Christ and Pop Culture
by Teagan Cooper
8h ago
Spoiler Alert: This article contains spoilers for the film Redeeming Love. As a young woman, growing up in an early 2000’s Christian home, I heard the praises of Francine Rivers’ 1997 novel, Redeeming Love. I was even given a copy of the book for my fifteenth birthday. The excitement surrounding its feature film adaptation was palpable in Christian women’s small groups. The book is entertaining and a wonderful romance story, to be sure. God didn’t instruct Hosea to marry an actual prostitute, but simply to marry an Israelite woman.  As a teen, growing up in the “I’m not single, I’m ..read more
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The Beautiful Community and Brutal Scapegoating in The Peasants
Christ and Pop Culture
by Alisa Ruddell
5d ago
Spoiler Alert: This article contains spoilers for the film The Peasants. “Love comes and goes, but land stays.” It’s not exactly the kind of advice a girl expects from her mother on her wedding day. But this is late 19th-century Poland and we’re in a traditional agrarian village where farmland is coveted and marriages are brokered; where men and women till the soil and provide grist for the gossip mill in equal measure; where peasants drink vodka like it’s water, work themselves to the bone, and dance together till dawn; where the cycle of the seasons and the liturgy of the Catholic Church bin ..read more
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St. Augustine’s Disordered Loves and The Iron Claw
Christ and Pop Culture
by Natalie Bassie
1w ago
Behind the dimly lit arena, past the gold-plated championship belt hoisted in the air, and further, beyond the success of a prominent professional wrestling family, lies tragedy, trauma, and a possible curse. Such is the story in A24’s The Iron Claw (2023), which explores the saga of the Von Erich family. Throughout the ’70s and ’80s, the Von Erich men were at the top of the professional wrestling world, due in large part to their ever-so-disciplined father, Fritz Von Erich, who held the AWA World Heavyweight Championship in the early ’60s. As time goes on, and the popularity of professional w ..read more
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The Iron Claw and the Grip of Generational Sin
Christ and Pop Culture
by Steve Woodworth
2w ago
In a recent interview, New York Times columnist David Brooks shared a simple question that he sometimes pulls out at dinner parties: “How do your ancestors show up in your life?” I have thought about that question dozens of times since hearing it. I thought about it as I sat across from a young man picking up the pieces of his failed marriage and when I was counseling a new mother trying to heal her childhood wounds of abuse and abandonment. It has been on my mind frequently while meeting with alcoholics, unfaithful spouses, and people who hate the church. And it is at the forefront of my mind ..read more
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Faith as Drama: God and the Individual in The Passion of Joan of Arc
Christ and Pop Culture
by Patrick Galvan
3w ago
Although faith and religion have frequently inspired cinematic escapism, relatively few movies manage mass appeal while capturing the essence of Christianity: the individual’s relationship with God. Films in the “Christian entertainment” genre score limited audiences due to low budgets and well-intentioned yet sanctimonious storytelling. By contrast, populist entertainments based on biblical stories—such as Cecil B. DeMille’s 1923 The Ten Commandments and his more famous 1956 remake—have become classics largely due to showmanship: the emphasis on huge sets, casts of thousands, and grandiose sp ..read more
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Dear Alien, Who Art in Heaven: Finding God in Asteroid City
Christ and Pop Culture
by Jake Raabe
3w ago
Wes Anderson’s films often play with a disconnect between their cheerful storybook visual style and their more somber subject matter and themes. Asteroid City is perhaps the starkest example of this trademark. Following a dizzying framing narrative that situates the story as a play within a documentary within a television program, an upbeat and immaculately-composed title sequence follows a train through a vivid desert while Johnny Duncan and the Bluegrass Boy’s “Last Train to San Fernando” plays.  The descent of the alien at the film’s midpoint is a kind of divine revelation, a sign fro ..read more
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The Scandal of Reading 37 | Tiffany Kriner on Louise Erdrich’s LaRose
Christ and Pop Culture
by The Scandal of Reading
1M ago
Tiffany Kriner joins Claude Atcho in continuing the exploration of the fruits of the Spirit. This week’s selection of LaRose by Louise Erdrich focuses on Peace. The novel opens with a horrific accident that sends two closely related families and an entire community into a deep spiral of trauma. Progressing through the novel, the reader is confronted with a question: Can a community, a family, recover from deep-seated trauma? LaRose by Louise Erdrich Information on Claude Atcho: Claude is the Vicar (Planting Pastor) for the Charlottesville church plant of the Diocese of Christ Our Hope, A ..read more
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Mixing Faith and Feminism: A Reaction to Bonnie Garmus’s Lessons in Chemistry
Christ and Pop Culture
by LuElla D'Amico
1M ago
It may seem strange as a Catholic reader that I found reading Bonnie Garmus’s 2022 bestselling novel, Lessons in Chemistry, akin to a religious experience. After all, its protagonist Elizabeth Zott states on the air during a live taping of her 1950s cooking show that she unequivocally does not believe in God. In another section of the book, a Presbyterian minister whispers to Elizabeth’s five-year-old daughter a secret: he does not believe in God either. Marriage, for Calvin, is culturally freeing. For [Elizabeth], it is restricting.  Moreover, the Catholic Church features in the novel ..read more
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CAPC’s Favorite Games, Memes, and Cultural Moments of 2023
Christ and Pop Culture
by CAPC Writers
1M ago
Pop culture is, of course, much more the films, TV shows, music, etc. It encompasses the entirety of our culture, and touches on themes of justice, education, faith, and technology as much as it does entertainment. And through it all, pop culture—even pop culture as seemingly frivolous as games—proved more than capable of bringing people together in fellowship and community. Below are our favorite pop culture moments of 2023, including epic fantasy, dark academia, the Duggar sisters, and Pedro Pascal. The 2023 Actor’s Strike Hollywood has a long and sordid history of actor abuse and manipulat ..read more
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CAPC’s Favorite Books of 2023
Christ and Pop Culture
by CAPC Writers
1M ago
Even with all of the technology at our fingertips, there’s still nothing quite like settling down into your favorite chair with your favorite beverage and losing yourself in a good book, be it an intriguing work of non-fiction or a wildly imaginative fictional title. Below are our favorite books of 2023, including an examination of feminism, musings on culture and psychology, space opera, and a tribute to Timothy Keller. Built from the Fire: The Epic Story of Tulsa’s Greenwood District, America’s Black Wall Street by Victor Luckerson This work of history reads like an epic novel, as Luckerson ..read more
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