Apple AirTag: Antitheft or Antistalking?
Hackaday Blog
by Dave Rowntree
2h ago
Occasionally, the extra features added to a product can negate some of the reasons you wanted to buy the thing in the first place. Take, for example, Apple’s AirTag — billed as an affordable way to link your physical stuff to your phone. If some light-fingered ne’er-do-well wanders by and half-inches your gear, you get notified. The thing is, the AirTag also has an anti-stalking measure, which after a while, notifies nearby iPhones, should the tag move but not be near your iPhone! In a recent video, [David Manning] explains that this feature is great for preventing the device from being used ..read more
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Want to Learn Binary? Draw Space Invaders!
Hackaday Blog
by Elliot Williams
5h ago
This was the week that I accidentally taught my nearly ten-year-old son binary. And I didn’t do it on purpose, I swear. It all started innocently enough. He had a week vacation, and on one of those days, we booked him a day-course for kids at our local FabLab. It was sold as a “learn to solder” class, and the project they made was basically a MiniPOV: eight LEDs driven by a museum-piece AVR ATtiny2313. Blinking lights make a pattern in your persistence of vision as you swipe it back and forth. The default pattern was a heart, which is nice enough. But he wanted to get his own designs in there ..read more
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You Got Fusion in My Coal Plant!
Hackaday Blog
by Navarre Bartz
9h ago
While coal was predominant in the past for energy generation, plants are shutting down worldwide to improve air quality and because they aren’t cost-competitive. It’s possible that idle infrastructure could be put to good use with fusion instead. While we’ve yet to see a fusion reactor capable of generating electricity, Type One Energy, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Oak Ridge National Lab have announced they’re evaluating the recently-closed Bull Run Fossil Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee as a site for a nuclear fusion reactor. One of the main advantages for siting any new generation sour ..read more
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Your Scope, Armed and Ready
Hackaday Blog
by Al Williams
11h ago
[VoltLog] never has enough space on his bench. We know the feeling and liked his idea of mounting his oscilloscope on an articulated arm. This is easy now because many new scopes have VESA mounts like monitors or TVs. However, watching the video below, we discovered there was a bit more to it than you might imagine. First, there are many choices of arms. [VoltLog] went for a cheap one with springs that didn’t have a lot of motion range. You may want something different. But we didn’t realize that many of these arms have a minimum weight requirement, and modern scopes may be too light for some ..read more
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MovieCart Plays Videos On The Atari 2600
Hackaday Blog
by Lewin Day
14h ago
The original Xbox and PlayStation 2 both let you watch DVD movies in addition to playing games. Seldom few consoles before or since offered much in the way of media, least of all the Atari 2600, which was too weedy to even imagine such feats. And yet, as covered by TechEBlog, [Lodef Mode] built a cartridge that lets it play video. It’s pretty poor quality video, but it is video! The MovieCart, as it is known, is able to play footage at 80×192 resolution, with a color palette limited by the capabilities of the Atari 2600 hardware. It’s not some sneaky video pass-through, either—the A ..read more
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Mirror, Mirror, Electron Mirror…
Hackaday Blog
by Al Williams
17h ago
If you look into an electron mirror, you don’t expect to see your reflection. As [Anthony Francis-Jones] points out, what you do see is hard to explain. The key to an electron mirror is that the electric and magnetic fields are 90 degrees apart, and the electrons are 90 degrees from both. You need a few strange items to make it all work, including an electron gun with a scintillating screen in a low-pressure tube. Once he sets an electric field going, the blue line representing the electrons goes from straight to curved. The final addition is the magnetic field. A pair of coils do the job. Wh ..read more
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Reggaeton-Be-Gone Disconnects Obnoxious Bluetooth Speakers
Hackaday Blog
by Bryan Cockfield
20h ago
If you’re currently living outside of a Spanish-speaking country, it’s possible you’ve only heard of the music genre Reggaeton in passing, if at all. In places with large Spanish populations, though, it would be more surprising if you hadn’t heard it. It’s so popular especially in the Carribean and Latin America that it’s gotten on the nerves of some, most notably [Roni] whose neighbor might not do anything else but listen to this style of music, which can be heard through the walls. To solve the problem [Roni] is now introducing the Reggaeton-Be-Gone. (Google Translate from Spanish) Inspired ..read more
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Op-Amp Drag Race Turns Out Poorly for 741
Hackaday Blog
by Dan Maloney
1d ago
When it was first introduced in 1968, Fairchild’s 741 op-amp made quite a splash. And with good reason; it packed a bunch of components into a compact package, and the applications for it were nearly limitless. The chip became hugely popular, to the point where “741” is almost synonymous with “op-amp” in the minds of many. But should it be? Perhaps not, as [More Than Electronics] reveals with this head-to-head speed test that compares the 741 with its FET-input cousin, the TL081. The test setup is pretty simple, just a quick breadboard oscillator with component values selected to create a squ ..read more
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Intuitive Machines’ Nova-C Makes It to the Lunar Surface in US Return After Half a Century
Hackaday Blog
by Maya Posch
1d ago
Intuitive Machines’ first mission (IM-1) featuring the Nova-C Odysseus lunar lander was launched on top of a SpaceX Falcon 9 on February 15th, 2024, as part of NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS). Targeting a landing site near the lunar south pole, it was supposed to use its onboard laser range finders to help it navigate safely for a soft touchdown on the lunar surface. Unfortunately, it was this component that was found to have malfunctioned as the spacecraft was already in lunar orbit. Fortunately, there was a with around. By using one of the NASA payloads on the lander, the Na ..read more
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Ask Hackaday: What’s in Your Garage?
Hackaday Blog
by Al Williams
1d ago
No matter what your hack of choice is, most of us harbor a secret fantasy that one day, we will create something world-changing, right? For most of us, that isn’t likely, but it does happen. A recent post from [Rohit Krishnan] points out that a lot of innovation happens in garages by people who are more or less like us. He points out that Apple, Google, and HP all started in garages. So did Harley Davidson. While it wasn’t technically a garage, the Wright brothers were in a bicycle workshop, which is sort of a garage for bikes. Even Philo Farnsworth started out in a garage. Of course, all of ..read more
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