Lit Hub Weekly: February 19 – 23, 2024
Literary Hub
by Lit Hub Daily
15h ago
TODAY: Poet, writer, playwright, musician, painter, and filmmaker Weldon Kees was born in 1914.  “It should be a modest request to ask that ‘left’ not mean supporters of authoritarian regimes.” Rebecca Solnit on the perennial divisions of the American left. | Lit Hub Politics “Malcolm believed that Muhammad’s teachings saved him from rotting away in prison; saved him from assimilationist ideas of wanting to be White; saved him from ignorance of Black history and humanity.” Ibram X Kendi on George Breitman and the enduring legacy of Malcolm X. | Lit Hub History “The intimacy I feel with ..read more
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Chef Eric Ripert on Keeping Seafood Simple
Literary Hub
by The Literary Life
1d ago
On this edition of The Literary Life, the great chef Eric Ripert talks with acclaimed radio host and print journalist Carlos Frias. In the course of their wide-ranging conversation, Chef Ripert speaks of his friendship with Tony Bourdain, his early influences in the kitchen, and his profound connection with the Dalai Lama. This was recorded live at Books & Books on the publication of Chef Ripert’s newest book, Seafood Simple, of which he writes: “I hope that this book is a source of inspiration and education, encouraging you to cook with confidence and approach seafood with joy and even l ..read more
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What Is Left? Rebecca Solnit on the Perennial Divisions of the American Left
Literary Hub
by Rebecca Solnit
2d ago
In late 1936 George Orwell, like so many young idealists from Europe and the USA, went off to fight fascism in Spain. By the spring of 1937 he realized he was in a war with not two but three sides. The USSR was holding back a full Spanish revolution while attacking the socialists and anarchists outside its control. Facing prison and possible execution himself, not from the fascists, but the Soviet-allied forces, Orwell fled Spain. His immediate commander, Georges Kopp, was imprisoned, and the leader of his militia unit, Andres Nin, was tortured and assassinated by an agent of Stalin’s secret ..read more
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Matthew Salesses on the Possibilities of Climate Fiction
Literary Hub
by Matthew Salesses
2d ago
A version of this first appeared in Lit Hub’s Craft of Writing newsletter—sign up here. 1. The metaverse is hot right now. Not only for Marvel (or Everything, Everywhere, All at Once), but in books, video games, even Facebook’s parent company, the metaverse is unironically omnipresent. I myself wrote a novel about the disappearance of a parallel-universe self, a premise I have felt as true to life since I was two and was adopted from Korea. The feeling that our reality has diverged from actual reality has become common. It is a kind of melancholy, wherein the loss that we cannot move on from ..read more
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Books for Indie Booksellers: On the Craft of Selling Books
Literary Hub
by Rachel Conrad
2d ago
As a bookseller, getting to handsell a stack of books is one of the greatest joys. But booksellers and bookstores play a vital role in communities across the country. Sure, they provide readers with an escape from reality, but they also help to curate a space where folks can become properly informed and educated about the reality that they live in—both the good and the bad. Over the past few years there has been a spectacular surge in books written for folks who want to learn more about the industry as a whole by veteran booksellers about these important institutions and the truly incredible ..read more
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What Should You Read Next? Here Are the Best Reviewed Books of the Week
Literary Hub
by Book Marks
2d ago
Leslie Jamison’s Splinters, Phillip B. Williams’ Ours, and Sarah Ruiz-Grossman’s A Fire So Wild all feature among the Best Reviewed Books of the Week. Brought to you by Book Marks, Lit Hub’s home for book reviews. * Fiction 1. Ours by Phillip B. Williams (Viking) 3 Rave • 2 Positive Read an excerpt from Ours here “…a vast and rapturous feat of fabulism … This is a 19th-century historical epic created with both a vivacious enthusiasm for folkloric traditions and a deep contemplation of what it means to be freed from the violent machine of slavery in the U.S. … Williams has a voice that soars ..read more
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Rethinking “Justice” in the Wake of a Violent Death Close to Home
Literary Hub
by Laurence Ralph
2d ago
We were asleep in Princeton, New Jersey, when the phone rang. My wife Aisha grabbed for it, listened—then let out a scream so loud, I was afraid the neighbors would call the police. It was her son, Neto—my stepson—on the phone. Neto had just informed his mother that his half-brother was dead. * Luis Alberto Quiñonez—known as Sito—was shot to death while sitting in his car in San Francisco’s Mission District. It was September 8, 2019. Sito was nineteen. His killer, Julius Williams, was seventeen. It was the second time the young men had encountered one another. Their first encounter, five year ..read more
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Visual Disposability: How Photographic Practice Dehumanizes Black Bodies
Literary Hub
by Kimberly Juanita Brown
2d ago
Featured image: Cover page of the New York Times, September 21, 1994. Courtesy of PARS International. Mortevivum is the term I have come up with to understand a particular photographic phenomenon: the hyperavailability of images in the media that traffic in tropes of impending black death. These tropes cohere around an ocular logic steeped in racial violence (and the nostalgia engendered therein), and they make any tragedy, any crisis, an opportunity for viewers to find pleasure in black peoples’ pain. The easy accessibility of a range of visual imagery adhering to these tenets constitutes th ..read more
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The Ever-Present Unseeable Terror: On Millenia of Human-Shark Relations
Literary Hub
by Tim Flannery and Emma Flannery
2d ago
Featured image: John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778 The most haunting of our imagined monsters remain hidden as they stalk us, striking when we least suspect it, while we are relaxing, or at play. The megalodon roams the ocean unseen and unseeable, except in our imaginations. And it often surfaces in our consciousness when we are at rest or play by the seaside. The reason that the great shark holds such a chilling grip on us must be sought in the very long history of the interaction of sharks with people. Is there anything more spine-chilling than the thought of being eaten aliv ..read more
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Welcome to the Hyunam-dong Bookshop
Literary Hub
by Lit Hub Excerpts
2d ago
Before running the bookshop, Yeongju had never considered whether she was suitable to be a bookseller. She thought, rather naively, that anyone who loves books could be one. It was only when she started her own bookshop that she realized she had a serious shortcoming. She fumbled questions such as ‘Which book is good?’ and ‘What’s an interesting book?’ Once, she made a complete fool of herself when a man in his late forties sought her recommendation for a book. “The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger is really interesting,” she enthused. “Have you read it?” The man hung his head. “No, I have ..read more
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