Past, Present, Future: Ha Ilè Honors Indigenous Art 
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Janet Hitt
1M ago
Artists Casey Koyczan and Eric Wagliardo each learned about rock art as many of us do—as a child or young adult in school, or out of an abundance of curiosity about the past, archaeology, or ancient art. But Koyczan, a Dene interdisciplinary artist from Yellowknife, Canada, says, “[I]t wasn’t until adulthood that I was able to experience them in person and fully realize their importance and spiritual meaning.” Also called petroglyphs (etched or pecked images) or pictographs (painted images), rock art has been created for thousands of years by people around the globe, from Australia to South Af ..read more
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A Conversation with Rashid Johnson  
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Janet Hitt
2M ago
Pictured Left to Right: Artist Rashid Johnson; Dr. Anna Katherine Brodbeck, Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art; Dr. Agustín Arteaga, The Eugene McDermott Director Rashid Johnson, this year’s TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art 2022 honoree and renowned multidisciplinary artist, gifted the DMA with his multimedia work, The New Black Yoga Installation. Featuring five men performing an enigmatic dance of ballet, yoga, tai chi and martial arts across a sun-soaked beach, the work explores the complexity of personal and cultural identity. Johnson’s ongoing meditations on black masculinity and ..read more
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Under the Influence: What Inspired Picasso 
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Janet Hitt
3M ago
Pablo Picasso’s first financial success came in spring 1906, when he sold the entire inventory of his studio to art dealer Ambroise Vollard for the then large sum of 2,000 francs. This allowed him and his partner, Fernande Olivier, to travel to Barcelona and from there to the Pyrenean village of Gósol. In Spain, Picasso was a different person, Olivier remembered: “[A]s soon as he returned to his native Spain, and especially to its countryside, he was perfused with its calm and serenity. This made his works lighter, airier, less agonized.”1 It is not surprising then that in the almost three mon ..read more
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One Way of Looking at a Mola
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Janet Hitt
4M ago
The Guna people live in an autonomous region of coastal Panama. The mola—a blouse with appliqué panels on the front and back—is one of the most recognizable Guna art forms.  Guna women devote hours daily to making molas together while they converse about their craft. This social context of production reinforces a shared set of aesthetic principles, including symmetry, contrast, and evenly distributed detail.[1] Well-made molas are admired and copied by others. This brightly colored mola features birdlike figures rowing boats. Velvety sleeves and rick-rack trim elevate the sumptuous detail ..read more
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Late Night Recap: Celebrating “Spirit Lodge”
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Dallas Museum of Art
10M ago
We honored the opening of Spirit Lodge: Mississippian Art from Spiro with a night of artist demonstrations, performances, art making, and more. See how we celebrated at Late Night in this slideshow, and visit Spirit Lodge for free now through August 7! Archery demonstration with Laughter Smith Archery demonstration with Laughter Smith The Caddo Culture Club Clothing twining and netting with Tonia Hogner-Weavel Loom weaving with Margaret Wheeler Loom weaving with Margaret Wheeler Special dance exhibition by Caddo Culture Club Special dance exhibition by Caddo Culture Club “Spirit Lodge” visit ..read more
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Behind the Scenes: Installing Senga Nengudi’s “Water Composition I”
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Dallas Museum of Art
11M ago
Influenced by Black cultural traditions and Japanese Gutai, artist Senga Nengudi’s work synthesizes multiple ideas circulating in the 1960s and 1970s: feminist practice, the role of materiality, and the relationship between activation, viewership, and performance. In her sculpture Water Composition I, currently on view in Slip Zone, Nengudi encloses colored water in plastic, creating a body-like form. Senga Nengudi, Water Composition I, 1969-1970/2019, heat-sealed vinyl and colored water, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund We asked Senior Preparator and IPM Coordinator Mary Nicolett what stood ou ..read more
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It’s All in the Family: The Earles in “Spirit Lodge”
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Dallas Museum of Art
11M ago
For over a thousand years, Caddo peoples lived, traded goods, made art, and grew crops in communities clustered around rivers in present-day Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. They, like other Mississippian peoples, constructed earthen mounds that marked and shaped their landscape for political and ceremonial purposes. You can visit and learn more about three of those mounds at the Caddo Mounds State Historic Site in East Texas. Colonization and colonialism dealt blow after blow to the Caddo, with epidemic diseases, forced removals to reservations, and the boarding school system all thr ..read more
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Q&A with Yonavea Hawkins, Caddo Beadwork Artist
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Dallas Museum of Art
11M ago
Yonavea Hawkins is an artist who creates intricate beadwork for Native American and Caddo cultural items. We are delighted to have her participate in the upcoming Late Night celebrating the new exhibition Spirit Lodge: Mississippian Art from Spiro, during which she will showcase several of her pieces and talk about her process and the connection between traditional and contemporary beadworking. Read our special Q&A with her to learn more about her practice ahead of the event on March 25! Yonavea Hawkins working on a belt on a loom during a “Live Bead” on stage at an event. H ..read more
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The Women of the Museum School
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Dallas Museum of Art
11M ago
Margaret Hull taught children’s classes at the Museum School from 1957-1970. Arts education has been an important feature of the museum since its founding in 1903. The Dallas Art Association held lecture series and programs featuring the artists, collectors, and art historians of the day to educate members on art and to promote collecting. After the first professional director was hired in 1929, the adult education offerings expanded to include director-led art history lecture series and gallery talks.   Educational offerings were extended to children in 1937 when Director Richard Fo ..read more
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Connections Across Collections: Love is in the Art
Dallas Museum of Art Uncrated
by Dallas Museum of Art
1y ago
Love is in the air—and in the art at the DMA! Take a look below to see our staff picks of art that we heART in celebration of Valentine’s Day. Wedding vase with butterflies, Mary Louise Eteeyan, Jemez Pueblo, 1975–2000. Ceramic. Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Robert I. Kramer, 2014.43.18. Becca Merriman-Goldring, McDermott Intern for Arts of the Americas Each spout of a Pueblo wedding vase represents one spouse; the two are joined by a bridged handle to form a continuous whole. Mary Louise Eteeyan emphasizes that significance in the decoration of this vase, with two butterflie ..read more
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