The eight-week check
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Tara George
4d ago
The eight-week baby check, usually carried out in primary care, provides an opportunity to assess a baby’s development, screen for potential issues, and address any concerns parents or guardians may have. NICE Guideline NG194 from 2021 covers in fine detail what should be done. Let’s walk through the key steps and considerations when performing an eight-week baby check, including what to note, what to review and what to refer.  The eight-week baby check is an important child health surveillance milestone to ensure the well-being of the infant and detect any potential health issues that ma ..read more
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Building Healthier Relationships With Gaming
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Andrew Tagg
4d ago
In a world where gaming addiction is on the rise, and at the same time, we see the benefits of gaming and grassroots Esports, you can see how confusing and contradictory the different narratives are around gaming. Despite becoming more mainstream in the last decade, there is plenty of misunderstanding from parents and professionals if they don’t play, and a lack of understanding from many young people who do. This knowledge gap creates a rift between parents and their kids, which becomes problematic and contributes to unhealthy relationships with gaming.  GameAware exists to bridge that ..read more
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Genitourinary symptoms in younger children
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Tara George
1w ago
Topic Paediatric Genitourinary Presentations Author Helena Winstanley and Tara George Duration Up to 2 hrs Facilitator Level ST4 and above Learner level FY1 and above (can be adapted depending on the level) Outline Pre-reading Basics Case 1 Case 1: Discussion Case 2 Case 2: Discussion Advanced Case 1 Advanced Case 1: Discussion Advanced Case 2 Advanced Case 2: Discussion Quiz Basics (10 mins) Main session: (2 x 15 minute) case discussion covering the key points and evidence including an optional practical session (10 mins) covering paediatric genital examination Advanced ..read more
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Testicular torsion
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Andrew Tagg
2w ago
I have long been fascinated by testicles. My first real encounter with the healthcare system took place when I was about seven years old and had to go into hospital for an orchidopexy, so I can empathize with all the young people who come through our emergency department with acute testicular pain. This week, NCEPOD (National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcomes and Death) produced a much-anticipated report on how we manage acute testicular torsion in young people. They collected data over a one-year period from 635 sets of case notes, 574 clinician questionnaires, and 142 organizational ..read more
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Bubble Wrap PLUS – February 2024
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Anke Raaijmakers
2w ago
Can’t get enough of Bubble Wrap? The Bubble Wrap Plus is a monthly paediatric Journal Club reading list from Professor Jaan Toelen (University Hospitals Leuven) and Dr Anke Raaijmakers (Sydney Children’s Hospital).  This comprehensive list is developed from 34 journals, including major and subspecialty paediatric journals. We suggest this list can help you discover relevant or interesting articles for your local journal club or allow you to keep a finger on the pulse of paediatric research. In the review part of the list, we found an interesting systematic review in JAMA Pediatrics a ..read more
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The 78th Bubble Wrap x Wexham Park Hospital
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Vicki Currie
3w ago
With millions of journal articles published yearly, it is impossible to keep up.  Our team have scoured the literature, so you don’t have to… or it might spark an interest to go and have a look at the full article. We have teamed up with the team from Wexham Park ED which has been coordinated by Dr Mohomed Ashraf Vahedna ST6 A&E. As a Trauma Unit within the Thames Valley Trauma Network, Wexham Park Hospital hosts trainees from across the spectrum of acute specialties. As senior trainees in Emergency Medicine, the reviewers enjoyed appraising these articles, which reflect their individ ..read more
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Cannabidiol in refractory status epilepticus
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Faith Hannon
3w ago
A UK-based study found that 4% of admissions to a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) over a 10-year period were due to refractory status epilepticus (RSE) – seizures which fail to terminate despite appropriate first and second-line treatments. Of those patients admitted with RSE, a subset will go on to develop super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE). SRSE can develop in patients with no prior history of a seizure disorder, such as in NORSE (New Onset Resistant Status Epilepticus) or FIRES (Febrile Infection-Related Epilepsy Syndrome) and those patients with pre-existent seizure ..read more
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Don’t Forget the Orbeez!
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Andrew Tagg
1M ago
Orbeez, those colourful, water-absorbent polymer beads, have become increasingly popular among children for play and craft activities. However, their small size and appealing appearance can pose significant health risks to young children. What are Orbeez made of? Orbeez are made from a superabsorbent polymer (SAP), primarily composed of cross-linked polyacrylate. This polyacrylate is formed from acrylate compounds, long-chain molecules consisting of repeating units known as monomers. In Orbeez, these monomers are typically derivatives of acrylic acid, giving the beads their unique absorbent p ..read more
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Scabies
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Andrew Tagg
1M ago
Melanie Thompson is a paediatrician working in the Kimberley, WA. She is interested in indigenous health and dares you to listen to her talk without itching. Scabies is one of the world’s top 50 infectious diseases, and we thought it deserved the chance to shine. Say hello to our little friend… The Global and Local Impact of Scabies Scabies affects around 100 million people globally at any given time, placing it in the top 50 infectious diseases in terms of disability-adjusted life years. Its impact exceeds that of diseases like dengue fever. In Australia, especially among children, scabies ..read more
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Are we on the right TRACT? 
Don't Forget the Bubbles
by Kathryn Mullan
1M ago
Transfusion Decisions in Severe Anaemia Reducing child mortality remains high on the global health agenda. It’s important we think about ways and means to do this with both population-based and targeted approaches.  Let’s take the humble blood transfusion – used in emergency departments across the globe and playing a key role in critical care. Severe anaemia is a common and life-threatening cause of hospital admission in children in sub-Saharan Africa. 8% die in hospital, with a further 12% dying in the six months following discharge. However, there is a huge variation in transfus ..read more
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