Eye Drops Linked to U.S. Outbreak of Drug-Resistant Infections
TIME » Health
by Mike Stobbe/AP
3d ago
NEW YORK — U.S. health officials said Thursday a company is recalling its over-the-counter eye drops that have been linked to an outbreak of drug-resistant infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week sent a health alert to doctors, saying the outbreak included at least 55 people in 12 states. One died and at least five others had permanent vision loss. The infections, including some found in blood, urine and lungs, were linked to EzriCare Artificial Tears. Many said they had used the product, which is a lubricant used to treat irritation and dryness. The eye drops ar ..read more
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8 Ways to Read More Books—And Why You Should
TIME » Health
by Angela Haupt
3d ago
I carry one of the most useful lessons of childhood with me to this day: always take a book. That rule served me well in third grade, when I sneakily read The Baby-Sitters Club under my desk during math class. (After my teacher confiscated it, I pulled out another.) It’s kept me busy on airplanes, during long drives, while taking a breather in the middle of a hiking trail, and in the corner of social gatherings. (Yes, I’m a blast at parties…if you want to debate the umpteenth remake of Pride and Prejudice.) [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] I love to read—and wish I could do more of it—becaus ..read more
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Heat-Related Deaths Are Rising. Here’s How Cities Can Keep Residents Safer
TIME » Health
by Haley Weiss
4d ago
Living in a city sometimes feels like living in the future. Urban life can mean exposure to new technologies, new ideas—and, sometimes, previews of the temperatures coming soon to nearby regions. In Europe, during hot periods, cities are an average of 2.7°F (1.5°C) warmer than surrounding areas, according to research published Jan. 31 in the Lancet. That amount may sound small, but scientists have also pinpointed it as the increase above pre-industrial temperatures that humanity will have to stick to for the best-case climate-change scenario. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] These so-called ..read more
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Inside the Race to Get Forever Chemicals Out of Raincoats
TIME » Health
by Zahra Hirji and Olivia Rockeman / Bloomberg
4d ago
Patagonia, Inc. has spent nearly a decade rejiggering its supply chain, redesigning products and dumping millions of dollars into a high-stakes trial-and-error process that’s nearly complete. This isn’t about optimizing for fashion. Patagonia, like practically every other outdoor apparel company, has long relied on per- or polyfluorinated chemicals — PFAS for short — to make its products water-resistant. The problem is that these chemicals, also known as fluorochemicals, PFC chemicals or forever chemicals, are toxic. They’ve been linked to cancer and other health problems and they don’t degr ..read more
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U.S. Energy Department Wades Into the Gas Stove Debate
TIME » Health
by Ari Natter / Bloomberg
4d ago
Gas stoves are coming under fresh scrutiny as a second federal agency has now stepped into the political firestorm with a proposal for new regulations for the appliances. The Energy Department proposal, published Wednesday, sets first-of-their-kind limits on energy consumption for the stoves, drawing fear from the industry that the regulation could effectively end the use of some products from the market. The proposal also sets energy usage standards for electric cook tops and new standards for both gas and electric ovens. The move comes just weeks after an official with the US Consumer Prod ..read more
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Weight Bias Is a Problem in Health Care. Here’s What Doctors Can Do
TIME » Health
by Elizabeth Millard
5d ago
Aubrey Gordon still recalls going to the doctor and having her blood pressure checked three times—because the provider couldn’t believe it was normal, given the fact that she’s overweight. Considering the treatment she’s received at doctors’ offices all her life, she wasn’t exactly surprised. “It’s kind of wild to see that my size comes with so many assumptions,” she says. “From the moment I walk in, my fatness is considered a problem to be solved. Even before I speak, there’s bias and misconceptions based on how I look. I’m considered lazy, non-compliant, and less worthy of care than a thin ..read more
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Stock Up on Free At-Home COVID-19 Tests While You Can
TIME » Health
by Jamie Ducharme
5d ago
As of May 11, the COVID-19 pandemic will no longer be considered a national or public health emergency in the U.S., the Biden Administration announced on Jan. 30. That’s not only a symbolic move. It also means the government will stop footing the bill for things like COVID-19 tests, vaccines, and treatments, which could bring changes to many of the free programs U.S. residents have come to rely on throughout the pandemic. For example, the end of the public health emergency may mean the end of the federal government’s free at-home test program, through which U.S. residents can periodically or ..read more
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The U.S. COVID-19 Public Health Emergency Ends in May. Here’s What Will Change
TIME » Health
by Alice Park
5d ago
Almost since the emergence of COVID-19, the U.S. has treated the disease as both a national and public health emergency. That will end on May 11, 2023, the Biden Administration announced Jan. 30. The decision to end these important designations will have wide-ranging impacts on many health measures that Americans have come to take for granted over the past few years, including free vaccines, booster shots, tests, and treatments. Declaring COVID-19 a public health emergency (PHE) in Jan. 2020 allowed the federal government—via a COVID-19 response led by the Department of Health and Human Serv ..read more
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Without Evusheld, Immunocompromised People Are on Their Own Against COVID-19
TIME » Health
by Jamie Ducharme
5d ago
When it comes to avoiding COVID-19 in the U.S., it’s increasingly everyone for themselves. The Biden Administration announced it will end pandemic emergency declarations in May 2023, which will affect the availability of free tests, treatments, and vaccines. But even now, nobody has fewer tools to protect themselves than immunocompromised people. On Jan. 26, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) revoked emergency-use authorization for Evusheld, a therapy first authorized in December 2021. Evusheld was meant to be used preventatively as an alternative to COVID-19 vaccines for people hav ..read more
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President Joe Biden Announces COVID-19 National Emergencies Will End on May 11
TIME » Health
by Zeke Miller and Amanda Seitz / AP
6d ago
WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden informed Congress on Monday that he will end the twin national emergencies for addressing COVID-19 on May 11, as most of the world has returned closer to normalcy nearly three years after they were first declared. The move to end the national emergency and public health emergency declarations would formally restructure the federal coronavirus response to treat the virus as an endemic threat to public health that can be managed through agencies’ normal authorities. Read More: COVID-19 Is No Longer a Public Health Emergency It comes as lawmakers have already en ..read more
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