“GDPR compliance is hard”, but is it? – 20 hours to overcome privacy issues in mobile apps
Internet Policy Review
by Konrad Kollnig, Pierre Dewitte
2w ago
GDPR Tracking – the large-scale surveillance and monetisation of individuals’ digital activities – is a serious privacy concern in digital technology. Most of the current discussion focuses on cookies in desktop browsers, yet this is only the tip of the iceberg. First, people now spend significantly more time on their mobile devices than on desktop computers. Second, cookies are but the tangible manifestation of a tracking ecosystem that raises many legal issues. As detailed in a recent complaint against IAB TechLab, programmatic advertising using real-time bidding, for instance, is said to br ..read more
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Resilience: A useful concept for science to cope with digital transformation
Internet Policy Review
by Benedikt Fecher, Birte Fähnrich
1M ago
In our knowledge-based society, hardly any development has changed scientific knowledge production and scholarly communication as profoundly as digitalisation. In our eyes, the concept of resilience is useful to inform change in science governance in the digital age. Starting with a discussion of the term, our essay discusses the potential of the concept of resilience for science in digital transformation. Defining resilience The notion of resilience stems from psychology, where it is conceived as a person's ability to successfully adapt to difficult or challenging life experiences. In recent ..read more
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Tackling news media underfunding: from copyright reform to cutting the (platform) middleman
Internet Policy Review
by Zsuzsa Detrekői
1y ago
Since the early days of online news portals at the end of the 20th century, online content publishing was a three-sided market from an economic perspective. Content providers (mainly online newspapers) wrote the content, advertisers paid for advertising space on their website, and users got the articles for free. With the development of the major digital platforms such as Facebook and Google, the financing of online press has collapsed. Today’s major digital platforms—such as Google and Facebook—started to grow in the middle of the last decade. Collecting more and more user data, they created ..read more
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Identifying harm in manipulative artificial intelligence practices
Internet Policy Review
by Suzanne Vergnolle
1y ago
This op-ed is part of a series of opinion pieces edited by Amélie Heldt in the context of a workshop on the Digital Services Act Package hosted by the Weizenbaum Institute for the Networked Society on 15 and 16 November 2021 in Berlin. This workshop brought together legal scholars and social scientists to get a better understanding of the DSA Package, in detail and on a meta level. Often presented as one of the most promising technologies of the decade, artificial intelligence gives us hope for economical, societal, and ecological progress. Alongside this hope, artificial intelligence alread ..read more
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P2B and the missing relational dimensions of the Digital Services Act
Internet Policy Review
by Ohad Somech, Maayan Perel, Niva Elkin-Koren
1y ago
This op-ed is part of a series of opinion pieces edited by Amélie Heldt in the context of a workshop on the Digital Services Act Package hosted by the Weizenbaum Institute for the Networked Society on 15 and 16 November 2021 in Berlin. This workshop brought together legal scholars and social scientists to get a better understanding of the DSA Package, in detail and on a meta level. Zac Plansky woke up one morning to discover that the products he sells on Amazon received a high number of suspicious favourable reviews, The Verge reported. Zac signalled the incident to Amazon which promptly rem ..read more
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The Digital Services Act: risk-based regulation of online platforms
Internet Policy Review
by Zohar Efroni
1y ago
This op-ed is part of a series of opinion pieces edited by Amélie Heldt in the context of a workshop on the Digital Services Act Package hosted by the Weizenbaum Institute for the Networked Society on 15 and 16 November 2021 in Berlin. This workshop brought together legal scholars and social scientists to get a better understanding of the DSA Package, in detail and on a meta level. I. The DSA as risk-based regulation The causal connection between the fourth wave of COVID-19 infections that Europe currently experiences, the rate of (non)vaccinated persons in the population and the influence o ..read more
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Framing the Digital Services Act within transatlantic digital constitutionalism
Internet Policy Review
by Giovanni De Gregorio
1y ago
This op-ed is part of a series of opinion pieces edited by Amélie Heldt in the context of a workshop on the Digital Services Act Package hosted by the Weizenbaum Institute for the Networked Society on 15 and 16 November 2021 in Berlin. This workshop brought together legal scholars and social scientists to get a better understanding of the DSA Package, in detail and on a meta level. The launch of the Digital Services Act in December 2020 has constituted a milestone in European digital policy, which is struggling to react to the consolidation of platform governance. The DSA aims to provide a n ..read more
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Beyond GAFAM: How size-or-silo regulation fails to account for organisational diversity in the platform economy
Internet Policy Review
by Nicolas Friederici, Inge Graef
1y ago
If Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen’s recent visit to Brussels has made one thing clear, it is that there is now wide consensus that digital platforms need to be more strictly regulated. She was warmly received by a number of prominent EU politicians including Thierry Breton, the European Commissioner for the Internal Market. Many posed with her and shared photos on social media. Such a public display indicates that regulators have become keenly aware of the platform economy and its unwanted outcomes concerning democratic participation, but also the future of work, control over digital in ..read more
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Germany: A change of (dis)course in digital policy
Internet Policy Review
by Matthias Spielkamp, Malte Spitz, Henriette Litta, Christian Mihr, Christian Humborg
1y ago
Civil society coalition Fax machines in health departments, schools without email addresses, millions spent on screwed-up apps—the pandemic has unforgivingly revealed that "business as usual" in digital policy making endangers our future. The focus must no longer be on security interests or the profit margins of tech companies, but on the common good. This is what F5, named after the reload key, stands for—a new coalition calling for a new perspective on digital politics. A closer look at recent debates in Germany shows how crucial civil society voices have been in preventing detrimental devel ..read more
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News media’s dependency on big tech: should we be worried?
Internet Policy Review
by Theresa Josephine Seipp
1y ago
Why did Australia decide to pass the NMBC? On 17 February 2021 the Australian government passed the NMBC, designed to have large platforms pay for hosting (local) news content and to address the bargaining power imbalance between digital platforms and Australian news businesses, especially Facebook and Google. The law seeks to enable fairer negotiation circumstances by forcing digital platforms to enter negotiations with news producers for sharing ad revenues from content that appears on their platforms. While the law received strong support in the Australian Parliament, it was staunchly fough ..read more
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