How Rachel M. Harper Unravels Her Characters
The Millions
by Julz Savard
2d ago
Rachel M. Harper’s most recent novel, The Other Mother, tells the story of musical prodigy Jenry Castillo as he tries to figure out how he fits into a complicated family. Raised by a single mother in Miami, discoveries about his late father and estranged paternal grandfather explode his world and confront him with questions about race, class, and sexuality. Harper is also the author of the novels This Side of Providence and Brass Ankle Blues. We chatted over email about motherhood, music, and treating writing as work. Julz Savard: Let’s begin with the novel’s origins. What inspired y ..read more
Visit website
The William Trevor Reader: “Being Stolen From”
The Millions
by Adam O’Fallon Price
3d ago
I think, of all the William Trevor stories I’ve read over the last 16 months, “Being Stolen From” is in its way the most Trevor-y. More than any other story, this one distills the main Trevorian operating principles into one piece—maybe more than that, it most clearly articulates what feels like his guiding philosophy of both life and narrative. Put another way, while I don’t necessarily feel this is his best work, or my personal favorite, it might be the one I would recommend to someone asking for a representative story to see if they like Trevor. If “Being Stolen From” isn’t your cuppa, WT m ..read more
Visit website
Tuesday New Release Day: Starring Hemon, Guns, Harding, and More
The Millions
by Thom Beckwith
3d ago
Here’s a quick look at some notable books—new release titles from Aleksandar Hemon, Priya Guns, Paul Harding, and more—that are publishing this week. Want to learn more about upcoming titles? Then go read our most recent book preview. Want to help The Millions keep churning out great books coverage? Then become a member today. The World and All That It Holds by Aleksandar Hemon Here’s what Publishers Weekly had to say about The World and All That It Holds: “Three-time NBCC finalist Hemon (The Lazarus Project) returns with a ..read more
Visit website
Adventures in Not-Writing
The Millions
by Ellen Pall
1w ago
One night in 2008, my husband and I arrived late to a dinner party. Dinner was in progress, our empty chairs glaringly vacant, and before I could even sit down, a guest turned around to ask me, “What are you writing?” “Writing?” I replied. I was surprised. In the dream—this was a dream, although of course I didn’t know that until later—it was clear to me that no one “wrote” anymore, that “writing” was a thing of the past. Everyone knew this. Too polite to embarrass the questioner by mentioning such an obvious fact, I said merely, “Oh, I’m not writing!” I woke with an almost blissful sense of r ..read more
Visit website
John Hendrickson Tells the Truth
The Millions
by Sophia Stewart
1w ago
Two stutterers walk into a bar.  No, really. John Hendrickson and I arrive at The Library in the East Village on a Sunday afternoon. We wave hello to the bartender and claim a shadowy booth in a tucked-away corner, underneath a projection of the 1958 remake of Dracula. This is the last stop on our tour of John’s old haunts from his salad days in New York City. Earlier we walked through Tompkins Square Park, where he used to spend Saturdays on a bench with a stack of magazines, and grabbed a bite at B&H Dairy, where he used to sit at the counter and flip through the Village Voice. (He ..read more
Visit website
Tuesday New Release Day: Starring Winslow, Kois, Tóibín, and More
The Millions
by Thom Beckwith
1w ago
Here’s a quick look at some notable books—new release titles from De’Shawn Charles Winslow, Dan Kois, Colm Tóibín, and more—that are publishing this week. Want to learn more about upcoming titles? Then go read our most recent book preview. Want to help The Millions keep churning out great books coverage? Then become a member today. Decent People by De’Shawn Charles Winslow Here’s what Publishers Weekly had to say about Decent People: “Winslow (In West Mills) chronicles the aftermath of a triple homicide that rocks a segregat ..read more
Visit website
Amina Cain Writes Toward Authenticity
The Millions
by Sophia Stewart
1w ago
A Horse at Night is Amina Cain’s first book of nonfiction, an essayistic rumination on the practice and philosophy of writing. The book mostly focuses on Cain’s own writing life—or, at least, the sort of writing life she would like to have. Throughout A Horse at Night she looks to the fiction of her literary foremothers (Virginia Woolf, Toni Morrison, Clarice Lispector) and contemporaries (Rachel Cusk, Renee Gladman, Claire-Louise Bennett), always finding something to admire or emulate. Cain is the author of the short story collections Creature and I Go to Some H ..read more
Visit website
John Hendrickson Tells the Truth
The Millions
by Sophia Stewart
1w ago
Two stutterers walk into a bar.  No, really. John Hendrickson and I arrive at The Library in the East Village on a Sunday afternoon. We wave hello to the bartender and claim a shadowy booth in a tucked-away corner, underneath a projection of the 1958 remake of Dracula. This is the last stop on our tour of John’s old haunts from his salad days in New York City. Earlier we walked through Tompkins Square Park, where he used to spend Saturdays on a bench with a stack of magazines, and grabbed a bite at B&H Dairy, where he used to sit at the counter and flip through the Village Voice. (He ..read more
Visit website
The William Trevor Reader: “The Time of Year”
The Millions
by Adam O’Fallon Price
1w ago
Is this the first happy ending in The Collected William Trevor? Looking back through the table of contents, I think it is. Arguably, “Lovers of Their Time” has a happy ending of sorts, with Norman secure in his sense that he’d had one great love affair in his life, though its unclear how seriously we’re meant to take this considering the affair was conducted in a hotel bathroom. It’s somewhat incredible to realize that “The Time of Year” is the first story out of the 57 I’ve so far read and written about in the Collected that offers an unvarnished and unironic (though muted and dark—this is st ..read more
Visit website
And When She Speaks: On ‘Fire Season’
The Millions
by Jonathan Frey
1w ago
The central character in Leyna Krow’s debut novel Fire Season is a schoolteacher-turned-prostitute-turned-swindler named Roslyn, who happens to be in possession of certain supernatural abilities. It is 1889 in the frontier town of Spokane Falls. At first, in a stroke of structural genius, Krow hides Roslyn from us in plain sight. She appears in the first sentence of chapter one, an offhand reference in our introduction to one of her johns, a put-upon banker who occupies our attention for the first act of the novel. Krow does not yet ask us to notice Roslyn, an alcoholic prophetess. Instead, Ro ..read more
Visit website

Follow The Millions on Feedspot

Continue with Google
OR