Django’s Journey: The Making of the Nomadic King of French Swing
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by Liam Ward
18h ago
Django Reinhardt was a legendary jazz musician and considered by some the greatest guitarist who ever lived, even more so when you find out he did it all with two fingers. He began as a nomadic busker before becoming a virtuoso and then a romanticised Parisian sepia memory, who still calls out in rolling arpeggios from the grooves of a crackling wax disc. A Romani nomad who would overcome great adversity in life to astound audiences with his genius and technique, he would influence all that would come after him with woven melodies that danced and sang from his fingertips. He would travel a mu ..read more
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13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. 690)
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by MessyNessy
3d ago
1. Rococo and Baroque Pools From a comment: “In 1629, in the Farnese theater in Parma, they did a Naumachia with sea monsters and naval battles, and for this purpose, the large and extraordinary scenic apparatus was used, flooding the stalls duly waterproofed with the waters of the Farnesian aqueduct conveyed into tanks under the stage and drained into the stalls thanks to the ingenious hydraulic system. So you’ve imagined something in Italy was real in the 1600s ..read more
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Let’s Entertain the Theory of the Tartarian Empire for a Moment
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by Liam Ward
1w ago
What do you mean you’ve never heard of the lost civilization of Great Tartaria? It’s only one of the weirdest architectural conspiracy theories going. It seems there has been a monumental cover-up to hide the truth from us all about an ancient empire that’s hiding in plain sight all around us – or so a fast-growing group of pseudo internet historians would have us believe. A kingdom so vast and architecturally sophisticated as to rival even the Roman empire, many of the world’s most famous architectural landmarks across the world are claimed to represent remnants of this lost empire ..read more
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Keeping up with Kitty, the First Woman to be Famous for Being Famous
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by Jennifer Walker
1w ago
The sex industry was one of 18th century Britain’s most lucrative enterprises, and the women and girls at the centre of this trade enraptured the nation, endlessly feeding society with tantalising tales from behind closed doors. But all too often, their voices have been left down the back of history’s sofa, largely due to the powerful men who preferred their own seedy practices to remain hidden from record. So let’s shift the spotlight. With a flair for the dramatic and a penchant for turning heads, Kitty Fisher wasn’t just the talk of the town in Georgian London, she was its undisputed ..read more
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13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. 689)
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by MessyNessy
1w ago
1. Abkhazia, the Lost Paradise by Pierpaolo Mittica Abkhazia is a non-place. However, it was once considered a paradise. In the years of the Soviet Union, this strip of land spanning 200 kilometres by 100 and facing onto the Black Sea was the chosen holiday destination of the political elite, who could enjoy hospitality of the highest standards ..read more
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Not Old World Europe, this is India’s Ghostly Town of Sidhpur
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by Claire Shepherd
2w ago
© ..read more
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The Artful Spy who Stopped Hitler from Emptying the Louvre
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by Cecile Paul
2w ago
Rose Valland © Archives des Musées nationaux At first glance she looks like just another bookish art historian in matronly 1940s garb – a most unlikely superhero. But Rose Antonia Maria Valland was a lone female spy who, during WW2, tirelessly and valiantly put her life on the line for the love of art, saving scores of looted works of art during Nazi occupation. In 1940, the museums of Paris with their invaluable art collections together with that of private collectors, fell prey to German wartime greed, with systematic raids orchestrated by Hitler’s art-looting arm. At the time, Rose Va ..read more
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13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. 688)
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by MessyNessy
2w ago
1. Paris Waiters Race as Storied Contest Returns On Sunday, for the first time in over a decade, Paris revived a tradition: an annual race of cafe and restaurant waiters. About 200 men and women swerved, jostled and jogged 1 ..read more
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A Libertine’s 5-Step Lifestyle Plan, Courtesy of Colette’s Lost Lover
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by The MNC Editorial Team
3w ago
Colette and Mathilde de Morny1. Keep everyone guessing with numerous aliases and identities Mathilde de Morny presumed many nicknames. Friends called her “Missy”, but in her artistic endeavours, she also went by the pseudonym “Yssim” (an anagram of Missy). When dressed in men’s clothing, she preferred “Max”, or sometimes “Uncle Max” or “Monsieur le Marquis ..read more
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Have you heard about the world of Habibi Funk?
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by Jessy Brewer
3w ago
Vintage Moroccan record sleeve, found by ..read more
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