How to keep Earth from being cooked by the ever-hotter Sun
Ars Technica
by Paul Sutter
5h ago
I’d wager a guess that we are, as a species, rather fond of our home planet (our wanton carbon emissions notwithstanding). But the ugly truth is that the Earth is doomed. Someday, the Sun will enter a stage that will make life impossible on the Earth’s surface and eventually reduce the planet to nothing more than a sad, lonely chunk of iron and nickel. The good news is that if we really put our minds to it—and don’t worry, we’ll have hundreds of millions of years to plan—we can keep our home world hospitable, even long after our Sun goes haywire. A waking nightmare The Sun is slowly but inex ..read more
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Review: Pitch-perfect Renegade Nell is a gem of a series you won’t want to miss
Ars Technica
by Jennifer Ouellette
19h ago
Enlarge / A young prodigal tomboy returns home from war and finds herself framed for murder in Renegade Nell. (credit: Disney+) Award-winning British TV writer Sally Wainwright is best known for the dramatic series Happy Valley (2014–2023) and Gentleman Jack (2019–2022), the latter produced jointly by BBC and HBO. Wainwright partnered with Disney+ for her latest series, the resolutely PG-13 Renegade Nell, which is a different beast altogether: a good old-fashioned, swashbuckling comic adventure with a supernatural twist, featuring a sassy cross-dressing heroine forced to turn to highway robb ..read more
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Alleged cryptojacking scheme consumed $3.5M of stolen computing to make just $1M
Ars Technica
by Dan Goodin
19h ago
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) Federal prosecutors indicted a Nebraska man on charges he perpetrated a cryptojacking scheme that defrauded two cloud providers—one based in Seattle and the other in Redmond, Washington—out of $3.5 million. The indictment, filed in US District Court for the Eastern District of New York and unsealed on Monday, charges Charles O. Parks III—45 of Omaha, Nebraska—with wire fraud, money laundering, and engaging in unlawful monetary transactions in connection with the scheme. Parks has yet to enter a plea and is scheduled to make an initial appearance in federal cour ..read more
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The Pixel 9 reportedly gears up for satellite SOS support
Ars Technica
by Ron Amadeo
19h ago
Enlarge / The smaller Pixel 9, with three cameras?! (credit: OnLeaks and 91 mobiles ) Google has been doing a lot of work in Android to support satellite-based messaging, and it sure would be nice if someone actually shipped some hardware it could use. Despite the feature launching with the iPhone 14 in 2022, Android manufacturers haven't been super receptive to copying the idea of satellite messaging. Qualcomm and satellite company Iridium built a working solution and incorporated it into Qualcomm's Snapdragon chips, only for zero Android manufacturers to support the feature, leading to the ..read more
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Judge halts Texas probe into Media Matters’ reporting on X
Ars Technica
by Ashley Belanger
19h ago
Enlarge / Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks during the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) meeting on February 23, 2024. (credit: MANDEL NGAN / ContributorAFP) A judge has preliminarily blocked what Media Matters for America (MMFA) described as Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton's attempt to "rifle through" confidential documents to prove that MMFA fraudulently manipulated X (formerly Twitter) data to ruin X's advertising business, as Elon Musk has alleged. After Musk accused MMFA of publishing reports that Musk claimed were designed to scare advertisers off X ..read more
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Song lyrics are getting more repetitive, angrier
Ars Technica
by Elizabeth Rayne
23h ago
Enlarge (credit: Henrik Sorensen) From ‘80s new wave to ‘90s grunge to the latest pop single, music has changed a lot over the decades. Those changes have come not only in terms of sound, though; lyrics have also evolved as time has passed. So what has changed about the lyrics we can’t get out of our heads? After analyzing 12,000 English-language pop, rock, rap, R&B, and country songs released between 1970 and 2020, researcher Eva Zangerle of Innsbruck University and her team have found that lyrics have been getting simpler and more repetitive over time. This trend is especially evident ..read more
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Apple removes the first iOS Game Boy emulator released under new App Store rules
Ars Technica
by Kyle Orland
1d ago
Enlarge / Photos of iGBA that appeared on the App Store before the app was taken down. (credit: https://web.archive.org/web/20240413221558/https://apps.apple.com/us/app/igba-gba-gbc-retro-emulator/id6482993626) Over the weekend, developer Mattia La Spina launched iGBA as one of the first retro game emulators legitimately available on the iOS App Store following Apple's rules change regarding such emulators earlier this month. As of Monday morning, though, iGBA has been pulled from the App Store following controversy over the unauthorized reuse of source code from a different emulator project ..read more
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Tesla to lay off more than 10 percent of its workers as sales slow
Ars Technica
by Jonathan M. Gitlin
1d ago
Enlarge / Tesla's Shanghai factory in 2023. (credit: VCG/VCG via Getty Images) Times are starting to get tough for Tesla. The electric vehicle automaker had been riding high, with quarter after quarter of successive growth and plenty of profits in the process. But lately, that success has mostly been due to a series of price cuts meant to tempt customers to buy into an aging lineup. This March, the company reported its first quarterly decline since 2020. Now, it plans to lay off more than 10 percent of its workforce, according to an internal memo seen by Reuters. "As we prepare the comp ..read more
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Sleeping more flushes junk out of the brain
Ars Technica
by Elizabeth Rayne
2d ago
Enlarge (credit: OsakaWayne Studios) As if we didn’t have enough reasons to get at least eight hours of sleep, there is now one more. Neurons are still active during sleep. We may not realize it, but the brain takes advantage of this recharging period to get rid of junk that was accumulating during waking hours. Sleep is something like a soft reboot. We knew that slow brainwaves had something to do with restful sleep; researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have now found out why. When we are awake, our neurons require energy to fuel complex tasks such as pro ..read more
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Why do some people always get lost?
Ars Technica
by Knowable Magazine
2d ago
Enlarge / Scientists are homing in on how navigation skills develop. (credit: Knowable Magazine (CC BY-ND)) Like many of the researchers who study how people find their way from place to place, David Uttal is a poor navigator. “When I was 13 years old, I got lost on a Boy Scout hike, and I was lost for two and a half days,” recalls the Northwestern University cognitive scientist. And he’s still bad at finding his way around. The world is full of people like Uttal—and their opposites, the folks who always seem to know exactly where they are and how to get where they want to go. Scientists som ..read more
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