Chemo Brain Could Be Hormonal Therapy Brain
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1y ago
Many women who get chemotherapy to treat breast cancer say they have problems remembering, thinking, and concentrating during and after treatment. These problems are commonly called “chemo brain” or “chemo fog” -- doctors call these issues “cognitive impairment” or “cognitive problems.” Some women may have trouble with: learning new tasks remembering names paying attention and concentrating finding the right words multitasking organizing thoughts making decisions remembering where things are (keys, glasses, etc.) A small study suggests that hormonal therapy medicines may contribute to chemo ..read more
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People Receiving Recent Cancer Treatment Have Worse COVID-19 Outcomes, Study Shows
Breastcancer.org
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1y ago
People who received cancer treatment within three months of being diagnosed with COVID-19 had a higher risk of being hospitalized, being admitted to intensive care, or dying from COVID-19 than people who haven’t been diagnosed with cancer, according to a study. The research was published in the January 2022 issue of the journal JAMA Oncology. Read the abstract of “Evaluation of COVID-19 Mortality and Adverse Outcomes in US Patients With or Without Cancer.” About the study What this means for you About the study Earlier research has shown that people diagnosed with cancer have a higher risk of ..read more
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Synthetic vs. Human Hair Wigs: Which Fiber Type is Right for You?
Breastcancer.org
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1y ago
An important choice you’ll make when buying a wig is the fiber type. The two main options are affordable, low maintenance synthetic wigs, or pricier, more natural-looking human hair wigs. But overall, there are actually five wig fiber types you can choose from: Synthetic wigs Heat-friendly synthetic wigs Wigs with a blend of human hair and heat-friendly synthetic hair Human hair wigs Each wig fiber type has pros and cons. When deciding which type is best for you, you can think about your lifestyle, the climate where you live, your budget, and how much time you want to spend caring for and st ..read more
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Top Research Presented at the 2021 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
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1y ago
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Debbie Denardi: Finding Community With Hereditary Cancer
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1y ago
When Debbie Denardi was diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer in 2010, she knew her DNA had probably played a role in her diagnosis. As a child in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Debbie had lost her mother to breast cancer, along with three of her aunts. Debbie’s oncologist referred her to a genetic counselor after reviewing her family history. The genetic counselor diagnosed Debbie with a BRCA gene mutation that increased her lifetime risk of breast cancer by 72%. “For me, knowledge is power,” Debbie says. “I was excited to know they’d found a reason for my cancer. At the beginning, I was rea ..read more
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Study Compares Aromatase Inhibitors vs. Tamoxifen for Pre-Menopausal Women With Early-Stage, Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer
Breastcancer.org
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1y ago
Pre-menopausal women diagnosed with early-stage, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer who took an aromatase inhibitor along with ovarian suppression after surgery had a 3.2% lower risk of the cancer coming back (recurrence) than women who took tamoxifen after surgery, according to a study. Still, there was no difference in overall survival. The research, “Aromatase inhibitors versus tamoxifen in pre-menopausal women with estrogen receptor positive early stage breast cancer treated with ovarian suppression: A patient level meta-analysis of 7,030 women in four randomised trials,” was presente ..read more
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Aromatase Inhibitors versus Tamoxifen for Pre-Menopausal Women Diagnosed With Early-Stage, Hormone Receptor-Positive Disease
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1y ago
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Experimental Elacestrant: A Standard of Care for Pretreated, Metastatic, Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer?
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1y ago
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Black Women More Likely To Develop Lymphedema After Breast Cancer Treatment Than White Women
Breastcancer.org
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1y ago
Black women are about 3.5 times more likely to develop lymphedema after having axillary lymph node surgery than white women, according to a small study. The research, “Impact of race and ethnicity on incidence and severity of breast cancer related lymphedema after axillary lymph node dissection: Results of a prospective screening study,” was presented on Dec. 10, 2021, at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. About axillary lymph node surgery About lymphedema About the study What this means for you About axillary lymph node surgery Axillary lymph node surgery — also called axillary lymph n ..read more
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2021 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Coverage
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1y ago
Every December, the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium brings together clinicians, researchers, and advocates to discuss the latest breast cancer study results. We’re proud to present our coverage below. Research News Experimental Elacestrant Shows Promise for Pre-Treated Metastatic, Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer ..read more
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