Blum & Blum's 1913 105 West 72nd Street
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
7h ago
  photograph by Richard Caplan, via corenyc.com At the turn of the last century, the 72nd Street blockfront between Columbus and Amsterdam Avenues had been lined with four-story brick and brownstone houses for years.  But residents of the Upper West Side were increasingly attracted to apartment house living and on July 28, 1912 the New-York Tribune reported that Brown Brothers Realty had purchased 105 through 109 West 72nd Street "as a site for an apartment house." New-York Tribune, July 28, 1912 (copyright expired) Well known apartment building architects George and Edw ..read more
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The Lost Hamilton Grange Church - 149th Street and Convent Avenue
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
7h ago
  The New York Architect, August 1907 (copyright expired) In 1802, Alexander Hamilton's 18-room mansion was completed at approximately what would become Convent Avenue and West 143rd Street.  Designed by the eminent architect John McComb, Jr., the Federal style residence was named The Grange.  Eight decades later, in 1887, the newly-formed Hamilton Grange Church was formed.  The New York Times would later explain, "The name of the church is derived not merely from the locality, but from the fact that the congregation at first worshipped in the old Hamilton mansion." Befo ..read more
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The 1882 Patrick M. Haverty House - 558 East 87th Street
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
4d ago
  John C. Henderson's laudable project of erecting affordable homes for middle-class families in 1881 was the first of at least two.  Thirty-two brick-faced homes filled the blockfront along East End Avenue and wrapped around the corners of 86th and 87th Street.  The architectural firm of Lamb & Rich placed the cost of construction of each at $6,500 when they filed plans in October that year.  The figure would translate to about $192,000 in 2024.  Completed in 1882, the individual Queen Anne designs melded into a picturesque enclave. 558 East 87th Street sits ..read more
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The 1853 Adolphe LeMoyne House - 62 West 11th Street
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
5d ago
  The floor-to-ceiling parlor windows were possibly originally fronted by cast iron balconies. Having inherited the land from his brother Andrew, in 1853 Wall Street broker James N. Gifford began construction on four upscale homes of West 11th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue.  Their three stories of red brick sat upon brownstone-clad English basements.  Transitional in style, their Italianate elements included the prominent window cornices and foliate-bracketed terminal cornices.  The architect's treatment of the entrances was a unique blend of Italianate and Greek ..read more
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A Limestone-Faced Phoenix --93-95 Franklin Street
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
5d ago
  When the Civil War erupted, Swedish-born marine engineer John Ericsson lived in the Federal-style house at 93 Franklin Street.  Years earlier, in 1844, he had designed the U.S.S. Princeton, the first screw-propeller warship.  Now his engineering mastering was called upon by the Union Navy.  He designed the ironclad Monitor, which defeated the Confederate Merrimac in the Battle of Hampton Roads in March 1862.  On March 12, he was honored at a special meeting of the Chamber of Commerce for his successful contribution to the Union's victory. The performance of the Mo ..read more
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The William Hubert Burr House - 161 West 74th Street
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
1w ago
  Hugh Lamb and Charles Alonzo Rich partnered to form the architectural firm Lamb & Rich in 1880.  Within only six years they had expanded into real estate development.  In 1886 they completed nine residences that wrapped the northwest corner of West 74th Street and Amsterdam Avenue. The easternmost house, 161 West 74th Street, anchored the row by rising a story above the others.  Essentially Queen Anne in style, Lamb & Rich gave the basement and parlor floors Romanesque Revival touches, most evident in the entrance.  Clustered colonettes with stylized ..read more
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The Lost Theodore G. Thomas House - 600 Madison Avenue
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
1w ago
  American Architect & Buildings News March 13, 1886 (copyright expired) The block of Madison Avenue between 57th and 58th Streets in 1886 was only slightly less prestigious than the mansion-lined Fifth Avenue a block to the west.  That year world famous gynecologist Theodore Gaillard Thomas moved his family into their newly-completed residence at 600 Madison Avenue.   Dr. Thomas had commissioned architect Bruce Price to design the five-story mansion.  His Queen Anne design was heavily blended with romantic elements of the German Renaissance--notably in the protruding ..read more
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The Hotel Griffou - 19 - 23 West 9th Street
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
1w ago
  The arches of the ground floor openings have been filled in. In 1855, three handsome rowhouses were completed at 55 through 59 Ninth Street (renumbered 19 to 23 West 9th Street in 1868).  Assessed to Samuel T. Hubbard, architectural historians agree they were most likely designed by James Renwick Jr.  Four stories tall, their rusticated ground floors featured fully arched windows and doors of matching proportions.  Heavy Italianate fencing anchored by stone gateposts protected the areaways.  A single, iron-railed balcony fronted full-height French windows at t ..read more
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George Fred Pelham, Jr.'s 1940 50 Park Avenue
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
1w ago
  With the pall of the Great Depression slowly lifting, in 1939 developer Louis Cowan began construction of a 17-floor apartment building on the northwest corner of Park Avenue and 37th Street.  The thoroughfare south of Grand Central Terminal, which had been lined with elegant mansions only a generation earlier, was increasingly filling with multi-family buildings. The persisting constraints of the Depression may have influenced Cowan's budget and, subsequently, architect George Fred Pelham Jr.'s materials and design.  Faced in red brick and trimmed in cast stone, Pelham's ..read more
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The 1940 Brick Presbyterian Church
Daytonian in Manhattan
by Tom Miller
1w ago
  photo by Jaucourt Despite religious bigotry that was forcing Presbyterians to worship in secret in the early 18th century, in 1716 a church was established.  Half a century later, in 1767, the esteemed architect John McComb Sr. designed what would be known as the Brick Church at Beekman and Nassau Streets.  The red brick Georgian structure was trimmed in white stone.  A central bell tower soared above the entrance. The Brick Church Memorial pamphlet, published on May 25, 1856, depicted the original structure. (copyright expired) On September 15, 1856, the trustees p ..read more
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