RUMPUS BOOK CLUB EXCERPT: GHOST PEOPLE by Sabrina Orah Mark
The Rumpus.net
by The Rumpus Book Club
20h ago
An excerpt from The Rumpus Book Club‘s March selection, HAPPILY by Sabrina Orah Mark forthcoming from Random House on March 13, 2023 Subscribe by February 15 to the Book Club to receive this title and an invitation to an exclusive conversation with the author via Crowdcast GHOST PEOPLE My son’s teacher pulls me aside to tell me she’s concerned about Noah and the Ghost People. “Ghost People?” “Yes,” she says. She is cheerful, though I suspect the main ingredient of her cheer is dread. “Can you encourage Noah to stop bringing them to school?” She is whispering, and she is smiling. She is a close ..read more
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Holding On and Letting Go: Rebecca Aronson’s Anchor
The Rumpus.net
by Janice Northerns
2d ago
Most of us worry—maybe even obsess, if we’re being honest—about our future as we emerge from a global pandemic and continue to grapple with the threat of climate change. In Anchor, her third poetry collection, Rebecca Aronson explores these issues on both the personal and the universal level as she writes about the death of her parents; her own mortality; and, ultimately, expands her grief to include our dying planet. The powerful opening poem, “Dear Gravity,” introduces Aronson’s major themes. The 18-line single stanza epistle is one of ten such letters in the book, all addressed “Dear Gravit ..read more
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Writing About a Muslim Girl Who Can Contain Multitudes: A Conversation with Bushra Rehman
The Rumpus.net
by Stephanie Jimenez
2d ago
Roses, in the Mouth of a Lion, Bushra Rehman’s newest novel out now from Flatiron Books, follows Razia Mirza—a young Muslim woman growing up in Corona, Queens in the 1980’s. As Razia discovers her queer sexuality, she struggles to know where she fits within her immigrant Pakistani-American community—and what lengths she’ll go to in order to become the person she’s destined to be. Unlike the cinephile, the literary booklover is rarely treated to the joy of a sequel. I first came to know Rehman’s work through Corona (Sibling Rivalry, 2013), a book selected by the NY Public Library as one of its ..read more
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Artifacts of Adolescence: Curing Season by Kristine Langley Mahler
The Rumpus.net
by Melinda Copp
3d ago
When I was in sixth grade, I carried with me everywhere a small bucket-shaped purse woven from colorful sarape fabric. A thin leather drawstring cord secured the contents, which included, among the chapsticks and small hairbrush, notes to and from all my friends. They were written on notebook paper and folded into small rectangles or triangles. These notes held crafted versions of ourselves: all our secrets, all our trash talk, all our rumors. I spent hours each evening writing and responding to them; my correspondence has never been so prolific since. I don’t remember what happened to them ex ..read more
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Rumpus Original Fiction: Daughterhouse
The Rumpus.net
by Kelly X. Hui
4d ago
My mother blames everything that goes wrong in our lives on the slaughterhouse next door, but I know better. She thinks it’s the violence that comes from the kill, that it leashes itself into our bones and makes us the way we are. She’s wrong. It’s always been festering inside us, a lineage of rot. Besides, we’ll never move. The apartment was dirt cheap on account of the smell in the summer, and we can’t afford anywhere better. We got a good deal, my mother likes to say, because no one likes to be that close to hunger, to see how ugly it truly is.   When I am so small I would believe anyt ..read more
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Writing About a Muslim Girl Who Can Contain Multitudes: A Conversation with Bushra Rehman
The Rumpus.net
by Stephanie Jimenez
4d ago
Roses, in the Mouth of a Lion, Bushra Rehman’s newest novel out now from Flatiron Books, follows Razia Mirza—a young Muslim woman growing up in Corona, Queens in the 1980’s. As Razia discovers her queer sexuality, she struggles to know where she fits within her immigrant Pakistani-American community—and what lengths she’ll go to in order to become the person she’s destined to be. Unlike the cinephile, the literary booklover is rarely treated to the joy of a sequel. I first came to know Rehman’s work through Corona (Sibling Rivalry, 2013), a book selected by the NY Public Library as one of its ..read more
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Navigating the Messy, the Scary, and the Beautiful: A conversation with Marisa Crane
The Rumpus.net
by Samantha Paige Rosen
6d ago
“I never feel like I know how to live in the world. Only on top of it, hanging on as it spins madly,” Marisa Crane writes in their debut novel I Keep My Exoskeletons to Myself (Catapult, 2023). From a place of curiosity and vulnerability, Crane explores grief, survival, shame, fear, hope, love, and resistance. The novel’s protagonist, Kris, faces the future of raising her newborn alone after her wife, Beau, dies in childbirth. In this speculative world, the baby has been labeled a “Shadester” for causing her mother’s death. Like her other mother, Kris, she is now sentenced to second-class citi ..read more
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Marco Polo
The Rumpus.net
by Christine Mi
1w ago
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February Spotlight: Letters in the Mail
The Rumpus.net
by The Rumpus
1w ago
Twice a month, The Rumpus brings your favorite writers directly to your IRL mailbox via our Letters in the Mail programs. We’ve got one program for adults and another for kids ages 6-12. Next month, subscribers will be receiving letters from Matthew Salesses and Anuradha Bhowmik, and Eleanor Glewwe and Lee Edward Födi, respectively.   Anuradha Bhowmik is a Bangladeshi-American poet and writer from South Jersey. She is the 2021 winner of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize for her first collection Brown Girl Chromatography, published by Pitt Poetry Series. Bhowmik is a Kundima ..read more
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A Kind of Common Madness: A Conversation with Liz Harmer
The Rumpus.net
by Seyward Goodhand
1w ago
Destructive desire, a brother so psychically contaminated by his twin sister’s sexual life it’s as though her actions are his, a mother who inflames the mutual enmity between her children, social codes as rigid as they are ambiguous: Strange Loops, the second novel by Canadian author Liz Harmer, has the intensity and drive of classic tragedy. The book opens with the main character, Francine—a thirty-three-year-old mother of two, a wife and teacher pursuing a PhD—having an illicit affair with a former student who just turned eighteen. From there, her life unravels with inevitability so fixed it ..read more
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