An Interview with Adrie Kusserow on her book, The Trauma Mantras: a Memoir in Prose Poems [by Elizabeth A I Powell]
The Best American Poetry
by Nin Andrews
7h ago
Adrie Kusserow's The Trauma Mantras, a memoir in prose poems, explores the warp and weft of existence as she examines Buddhism, American culture, and global refugees.Trained in comparative religion and cultural anthropology, Kusserow is a Professor of Anthropology at Saint Michael’s College in Vermont. In this brilliant collection,  she critiques Western conceptions of trauma and suffering, sparing no one, not even herself, in these fierce, beautiful meditations.  Kusserow’s ethnographic fieldwork with refugees, as well as her role as poet, mother, professor, daughter, and noted psy ..read more
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The New York School Diaspora (Part 70): Todd Osborne [by Angela Ball]
The Best American Poetry
by Angela Ball
7h ago
  First, Second, Third Person (with a line from Robert Creeley) in memory of D.R. I am still stuck on poetry I said, once, a lifetime ago, or not too long ago, depending on who you are, or who I is, when you reads this or I writes it. And it’s true even now. An old friend writes that she has moved beyond stanzas, and all I can think is—how? I am trying, even now, to decipher the mysteries of a couplet, of an amulet and quick surprise part of me wants to say, borrowing another poet’s words, or stealing like great artists are often said to do, but I’m not sure that’s true. The words stay t ..read more
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Alise Alousi: Pick of the Week [ed. Terence Winch]
The Best American Poetry
by Terence Winch
2d ago
                                      _________________________________________________ Detroit 1998, a Reminiscence after Eliot Weinberger   In Detroit there is no fresh fruit.   We eat with our eyes. Our children are strong as weeds. They learn the alphabet backwards and grow up never wanting to leave.   Our streets are named for cigarettes, highways—winning lotto numbers. In Detroit we don’t stop at stop signs and traffic lights never turn red. We crave the smell of gasoline. &nbs ..read more
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On Movies and Beauties (part one) [by Mark Strand]
The Best American Poetry
by The Best American Poetry
4d ago
When I was very young, say, around seven or eight, I went in for cowboy flicks. I usually went with a pack of boys my own age; we paid our dime and watched a double feature. The National Anthem was played and sometimes there’d be a yo-yo contest. There were usually one or two cartoons, a serial of Superman or Captain Marvel and always Movietone Newsreels. I had no use for Tom Mix or Gene Autry or Roy Rogers. I liked Randolph Scott, I guess because I admired his perfectly chiseled features and the fact that he didn’t sing. But I’ll talk about the male stars of my past at another time. Now I w ..read more
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Christine Bastin: You won’t have the words for your transcendence. But your dance will [By Tracy Danison]
The Best American Poetry
by Paul Tracy DANISON
5d ago
Christine Bastin, center rear, artistic director, Fabrique de la Danse, with students. Photo © Emmanuelle Stäuble Christine Bastin is a co-founder, with Orianne Vilmer, of Fabrique de la Danse, where Bastin has been artistic director and Vilmer has been director since 2015. Fabrique de la Danse was the first and remains the only dance school currently able to deliver a professional certification for choreographers. Bastin calls herself a “dance native” and says she does not remember a time when she did not dance. She began dancing at 7 or 8 years old and was among the first graduates of Dans ..read more
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John Ashbery's Multiple Choice Questions
The Best American Poetry
by The Best American Poetry
5d ago
From John Ashbery's "One Hundred Multiple-Choice Questions": Thinking can help to solve problems because a) problems exist only in the mind b) problems must be taken seriously c) mind triumphs over matter d) not to think would be to avoid the problem e) no problem can be completely solved anyway f) it is our duty to think our way out of problems Can't argue with that. Or this: Religious freedom means a) that God does not exist b) that God is dead c) that the individual is free to worship God as he chooses d) that we need attend church only on Sundays e) that we can do as we please f) that ..read more
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Happy Birthday, Wystan
The Best American Poetry
by The Best American Poetry
5d ago
  If equal affection cannot be, Let the more loving one be me. -- from The More Loving One by W. H. Auden (1907-1973)     Find more posts about W. H. Auden here. -- sdh        Related Stories Emerson of the week: Why travel?   ..read more
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WEDNESDAYS WITH DENISE: February 21, 2024
The Best American Poetry
by Denise Duhamel
1w ago
In January, Knopf published Gregory Pardlo’s Spectral Evidence. “Spectral evidence” is an actual legal term referring to “witness testimony that the accused person's spirit or spectral shape appeared to him/her in a dream at the time the accused person's physical body was at another location.” Huh? Yes, I am serious. And so is Pardlo. This kind of evidence was accepted during the Salem Witch Trials. Pardlo’s poems brilliantly explore this notion as he brings forward the fear of “the other” not only in terms of gender but also of race—America’s continual projection and demonization. Pardlo’s p ..read more
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Emerson of the week: Why travel?
The Best American Poetry
by The Best American Poetry
1w ago
Travelling is a fool's paradise. Our first journeys discover to us the indifference of places. At home I dream that at Naples, at Rome, I can be intoxicated with beauty, and lose my sadness. I pack my trunk, embrace my friends, embark on the sea, and at last wake up in Naples, and there beside me is the stern fact, the sad self, unrelenting, identical, that I fled from. I seek the Vatican, and the palaces. I affect to be intoxicated with sights and suggestions, but I am not intoxicated. My giant goes with me wherever I go. But the rage of travelling is a symptom of a deeper unsoundness affect ..read more
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Frank Sinatra sings "Stardust" on the Lucky Strike radio show (1942)
The Best American Poetry
by The Best American Poetry
1w ago
         Related Stories Doris Day & Gordon McRae sing the great WWI morale-booster   ..read more
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