Wolf Willow, Flowers, Farmers and Friends
GardenRant
by Lorene Edwards Forkner
3d ago
Even more than lilacs (!!) in late June and a remarkable run on my wildlife Bingo card, my most treasured takeaway from this year’s Slow Flowers Summit is the scent of wolf willow (Eleagnus commutata), a sturdy shrub clothed in silvery, sage-green foliage. The plant’s tiny, almost obscure yellow flowers emit an alluring alpine fragrance that travels on a breeze. The silvery foliage and lemon-yellow flowers on wolf willow (Eleagnus commutata) Photo: Lorene Edwards Forkner I am neither a flower farmer nor a floral designer — at best you could say I’m farmer/floral adjacent. Or at least that’s ..read more
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Lincoln Smith’s Agroecological Research Garden: Forested
GardenRant
by Susan Harris
5d ago
Lincoln Smith speaking to members of the Greenbelt-Beltsville Garden Club in his forest garden. Lincoln Smith has been described, by one Washington Post  reporter, as a “landscape architect gone rogue,” after he quit his “high-end landscape architecture firm” to experiment and advance forest agriculture, the goal proclaimed on his website. He started his “forest garden” in 2012 on 10 acres of former cornfield that he leases from the church he’s attended since childhood, located in Bowie, Maryland (very near me).  Is it Permaculture? How about Agroecology? I got to tour the Fores ..read more
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Ear Seeds and Acupuncture
GardenRant
by Allen Bush
1w ago
  A year ago, my daughter and I drove to Vancouver and made the rounds. Molly lives in Bellingham, Washington, near the Canadian border. The first stop was the University of British Columbia Botanical Garden for a walk around; the second stop was Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside for my introduction to the healing powers of auricular acupuncture with ear seeds. Listen up. Ear seeds for healing and the garden The UBC Botanical Garden was extraordinary. I covet the lushness of the temperate Pacific Northwest—at least in the summer—when the weather is usually mild, and skies are blue.  W ..read more
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The Joy Of Perfumed Plants
GardenRant
by Ben Probert
1w ago
It’s summer. That means glorious sunny days with flower-filled gardens and air filled with heady fragrances. I found out by accident that abelias are perfumed Unless you’re in my part of Britain, in which case it often means rain. The Importance Of Perfumed Plants Even the most foliage-obsessed of us enjoy flowers. There seems to be so many around at the moment: simple single flowers, daisies of various types, tall spires of delphiniums and lupins, the ruffled double roses. In late winter the daphnes are relished for perfume, but they offer nothing for summer when we’re more likely to be e ..read more
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Gardening and writing
GardenRant
by Bob Hill, Ranter Emeritus
1w ago
  It’s all about filling a blank space, visualizing what can be, moving words or plants around, just shoving the familiar, the conscious mind out of the way and allowing instinct and creativity to take over. Let the words, the plants, the existing landscape tell you what they want to say. Good friend, neighbor and gardener Susan Loya is very good at that. Not long ago she was looking at our fenced-in area with fountain we named “Janet’s Garden,” a more quiet place centered in our acres of madness. (Janet Hill, Bob’s wife,  has always been a calming effect. They will celebrate their ..read more
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Amy Stewart’s celebration of trees and their people – plus a giveaway
GardenRant
by Elizabeth Licata
2w ago
Longtime Rant readers know the name of Amy Stewart as one of this blog’s original founders. But I have to assume many reading this know Stewart even better for her books on gardening and beyond. They include From the Ground Up, The Earth Moved, Flower Confidential, Wicked Plants, Wicked Bugs, The Drunken Botanist and – maybe most of all – 7 detective novels based on a true story, the Kopp Sisters series, which began with Girl Waits with Gun. The final two Kopp sisters books came out during the pandemic, with #7, Miss Kopp Investigates, appearing in 2021. And now Stewart’s returned to writing ..read more
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Shame About the Garden–The Heat and Drought of June 2024: A Letter from the Midwest
GardenRant
by Scott Beuerlein
2w ago
Behind the posts, articles, conferences and social media, there’s a backstory. Have you kept up with the digital correspondence between Ranters Scott Beuerlein and Marianne Willburn?  You can start here, or go back and find the entire correspondence at Dear Gardener. Cincinnati, Ohio June 30, 2024 Dear Marianne, You are so justified in the hurt and anger you so lyrically expressed in your recent letter(s), and I say you have every right to lash out at me in the severe way in which you did. I have been dreading this day, and it came. And it did not disappoint. You really have a way with w ..read more
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Extreme heat with no rain? Praise be the plants that survive without watering!
GardenRant
by Susan Harris
2w ago
Like so many of your gardens, mine is undergoing the greatest test of all – prolonged extreme heat with no rain. And I’m betting you’re like me in not having an irrigation system to rely on. (Never wanted one, though. Still don’t.) I’m in a humid hardiness zone 7. So you may want to join me as I whine about how much hand-watering I’m having to do, even in my small garden.  Which makes me more grateful than ever for the plants that I can still ignore under these extreme conditions, especially the larger plants and the ones that cover a lot of ground.  I know that as temperatures rise ..read more
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Waiting
GardenRant
by Anne Wareham
2w ago
I have spent a large part of the past month waiting. Waiting for the two of us to recover from a nasty chest infection – not quite there yet. Waiting for our internet to be mended – a serious matter when we, and our neighbours, have no mobile signal either. It came back yesterday – hurray. And then, I realised, I was waiting for the principal border in the garden, which is visible from the house, to get going. It does have various bits and pieces which offer some pleasure before it really begins to work. But now it begins to please me properly. The most important bit is Koenigia alpina, previo ..read more
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Dry Humor Is One Thing, Dry Gardens Another: A Letter to The Midwest.
GardenRant
by Marianne Willburn
3w ago
Behind posts, articles, conferences and social media, there’s a backstory. Have you kept up with the digital correspondence between Ranters Scott Beuerlein and Marianne Willburn?  You can start here, or go back and find the entire correspondence at Dear Gardener. Lovettsville, VA June 26, 2024 Dear Scott, I assume that in the hopes of a few cheap Likes, the contents of the letter you promised months ago with a contrite and naïve heart have instead gone to Facebook as a series of ironic asides and pithy one-liners.  Can you imagine the epic, best-selling novel you would have writte ..read more
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