Age of Endarkenment: Medical Misinformation & What Vets Can Do About It
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
3d ago
Obviously, the whole purpose of the SkeptVet is to combat misinformation and to promote evidence-based pet health. I first used the term Age of Endarkenment in a post for the much more influential Science-Based Medicine blog. Then, I was focused on the relatively narrow issue of the AVMA being unwilling to acknowledge the clearly evidence fact that homeopathy is useless pseudoscience and that vets shouldn’t offer it to clients (you can refresh yourself on the whole sorry saga in these posts). When I was honored with the VIN Veritas Award, I was invited to give a rounds presentation on the Vet ..read more
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Evidence Update: Leap years Supplement
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
6d ago
I recently reported on the results of a clinical trial conducted at North Carolin State University on the purported “anti-aging” Leap Years. The study provided no convincing evidence of a beneficial effect, and despite a single statistically significant finding at one time point, the data looked about as clearly negative as a study measuring multiple outcomes like this can. Despite this, the company and its most prominent figure, Dr. David Sinclair, promoted it heavily as a major advance in canine geroscience. The pushback for these excessive and unsupported claims was surprisingly strong, an ..read more
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Choosing Wisely: Things to Stop Doing in Your Practice (Maybe?) 2024
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
2w ago
One of my most popular, and controversial, topics to talk about at continuing education meetings is the evidence for abandoning practices that are deeply entrenched in routine veterinary practice. Vets are pretty good at adopting new things when evidence shows these might be worthwhile, often even when the evidence isn’t very good. But giving up things we are used to doing is much harder, even when the evidence is strong. Here are a few things vets might want to think about changing, and you might want to question if they are offered to you. CHOOSING WISELY: THINGS TO STOP DOING IN YOUR PRACTI ..read more
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Spectrum of Care- What is it and why should I care?
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
2w ago
I am preparing a number of conference presentations for this year, and one of the new ones is on the topic of Spectrum of Care. This is a concept I have been involved this for a while, since participating in a working group organized by a classmate of mine that culminated in a publication kicking off a discussion about balancing the needs of patients and the rising costs of veterinary care. Below are some thoughts on the subject. If you want more, I will be talking about this (and lots of other topics) at the Pacific Veterinary Conference in San Francisco July 11-12, 2024. WHAT IS SPECTRUM OF ..read more
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The Health Effects of “Processed Foods” and Why Nutrition is More Important than the Amount of “Processing”
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
1M ago
In the endless debates about the health effects of various approach to feeding our canine and feline companions, the subject of “processed foods” or “ultra-processed foods” comes up often. Generally, the argument is made that traditional commercial pet foods, including canned but most especially extruded dry foods (aka kibble), are “ultra-processed” and are functionally equivalent to potato chips and sliced lunch meat. Since the evidence is pretty consistent that convenience foods, packaged snack foods, and most “fast-foods” are associated with increased health risks in humans, the conclusion ..read more
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Evidence Update: A Systematic Review of Studies Evaluating Vegan Diets for Dogs and Cats
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
1M ago
Over the years, I have reviewed the general evidence and some specific studies concerning vegetarian and vegan diets for dogs and cats. Despite the aggressive claims of some advocates for such diets (including some egregiously unscrupulous individuals), the actual evidence has not been extensive or definitive. My conclusions in previous posts have been that there is no clear evidence vegetarian or vegan diets have benefits for dogs and cats, and there is some real potential for harm, especially in cats: Vegetarian Diets for Dogs & Cats, 2019 There is no evidence that vegetarian ..read more
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Talks from WVC 2024- Nutrition for Lifespan Extension and Frailty
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
2M ago
Here are some low-quality recordings of a couple lectures I gave this year at the Western Veterinary Conference in Las Vegas ..read more
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Evidence Update: Is Surgery Necessary for Dogs with Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture?
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
2M ago
Back in 2011, I first wrote about the issue of concerning whether dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) ruptures did better with surgery or with non-surgical management. My conclusion at that time was: For most dogs under 15kg, conservative management (primarily restricted activity for 3-6 weeks, achieving and maintaining and appropriate body weight, and possibly physical therapy and pain medication) can achieve acceptable comfort and function. In larger dogs, significant arthritis is inevitable and dysfunction is extremely likely without surgical treatment.  In 2013, I write an upd ..read more
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Fickle Justice: Some Quacks get Punished, Most Get Away with It
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
2M ago
One of the goals of this blog has always been to warn pet owners about dangers to their animals: dangerously unreliable ideas and ways of thinking about science and medicine, dangerous therapies (or at least those not yet proven to be safe or effective), and dangerous individuals who promote both unscientific approaches and unproven or unsafe treatments. There is remarkably little effective regulation and oversight of pet healthcare products, apart from prescription medications. Unscrupulous sellers of snake oil, including vets, can often get away with egregiously illegal and dangerous claims ..read more
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Evidence Update: Leap Years Anti-aging Supplement Study
The SkeptVet Blog | A Vet Takes a Skeptical & Science-Based Look at Veterinary Medicine
by skeptvet
3M ago
Back in January of 2023 I reviewed claims for a purported anti-aging supplement for dogs called Leap Years. My conclusion at the time was- Leap Years is similar to most veterinary supplements on the market: It is based on some plausible ideas with limited supporting evidence, and it is marketed with claims that go well beyond anything scientifically proven or reasonable.  In that review, I pointed out that one piece of evidence the manufacturer cited to support their claims was an unpublished clinical study conducted at the veterinary school at North Carolina State University ..read more
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