Developing a Scene Outline for Your Novel
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
3d ago
Writing a novel is a challenge. If you’ve done it (or tried to), you understand. I’m a big proponent of plotting my novels in advance. While many writers dislike plotting and feel comfortable “pantsing,” it can take a lot of years and practice to get down novel/story structure well enough to “wing it” and come out with a solid story. I do believe that even pansters can benefit by some basic plotting, and putting together a simple outline is a great way to start coalescing ideas and pieces of story into some organization. I’ve worked with countless (well, at least I’ve never tried to count them ..read more
Visit website
Conflict in Story: Character versus Self
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
2w ago
This post is a reprint from a few years ago, shared again to help you nail the opposition in your story. Traditionally, there are four general types of opposition at the heart of a story. While our protagonist might face multiple kinds of opposition, the primary one will usually fall into man vs. man, man vs. nature, man vs. society, or man vs. self (and of course you can replace man with woman, or robot, or alien). In story structure, there are key scenes in which the opposition rears its/his/her ugly head and “pinches” the protagonist—hence why these are called “pinch points.” Two specific p ..read more
Visit website
The Intersection of Voice and Deep POV
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
3w ago
When writers talk about “voice,” they are usually referring to an author’s style of writing. Agents use this definition too. I’ve written about this before, as I feel this designation is off, and often confusing. In this age of writing in deep POV—meaning, each scene in fiction is coming “through” a particular character, in that every word of the scene is her thoughts, observations, sensory experiences, and opinions. Since that’s the case, that means the entire scene has to be in that character’s “voice,” not the author’s. This is a huge problem I see in most of the manuscripts I edit and crit ..read more
Visit website
Crafting a Compelling Story Premise
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
1M ago
UPCOMING: I’m doing a workshop on crafting a terrific premise on January 11, 2-4 p.m. Pacific Time (it will be recorded, so you can watch it later if you can’t attend). Space is limited, so be sure to enroll ASAP. And bring your premise statement to share and get feedback on it!  Below is a reprint of a post I wrote a few years back, published again here to help you understand what a premise is and why it’s so important to come up with one that is fresh and compelling! Most writers are clear about the inciting incident or initial disturbance that has to come near the start of the book. Ye ..read more
Visit website
The Writer’s Tactical Plan
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
1M ago
For this last week of 2022, I’m wrapping up the monthlong look at strategic planning for writers. I’ve been going over the four basic elements writers need to consider to put together a real plan that is practical, efficient, and useful. These four elements are vision, strategy, tactics, and action. I’ve covered the first two a bit and discussed how to come up with milestones to place along your journey to reach your vision. Now we’re going to look at tactics and action. My hope is that by going over these posts and writing out your strategy, you’ll get a clear vision for what you’d like your ..read more
Visit website
How to Strategically Set Writing Benchmarks
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
1M ago
We’re continuing our journey through strategic planning. Be sure to get the free ebook by joining my mailing list! In the last two posts I introduced the components writers need in order to formulate a practical, usable strategic plan for their writing career. Instead of wandering aimlessly, writers can envision what they want their careers to look like in a year, two years, even five years, and reach a specific destination: the realization of their vision. Last week I looked at the first element needed to consider in strategic planning: the vision itself. Hopefully you filled in the blanks fo ..read more
Visit website
Forming Your Strategic Vision for Your Writing Career
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
2M ago
We’re continuing our dive into strategic planning, looking at a series of posts I wrote ten years ago that are just as pertinent and useful today. Be sure to sign up for my mailing list (click on the link on the right) and get the ebook on strategic planning for writers! In last week’s post I introduced the four things we need to look at when planning our writing careers: vision, strategy, tactics, and action. Rather than have a nebulous idea of what we want to achieve as writers, it’s helpful and wise to think about the goals we want to reach. Then we want to take our vague vision and form it ..read more
Visit website
The 4 Things You Need for Writing Success
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
2M ago
It’s that time of year again! I’m bringing back the series of posts I wrote nearly ten years ago to help you strategically plan your writing career. It helps to assess where you’ve been on your journey and what you envision for the new year. Dive in! Since 2022 is winding down and many of us start looking ahead to a new year with hope, anticipation, and uncertainty, I want to devote the last few posts of this year to something I feel is essential for all writers (and probably for just about everyone with any career goals whatsoever): strategic planning. Some of you are probably groaning, for p ..read more
Visit website
5 World-Building Tips to Write a Captivating Novel
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
2M ago
Today’s guest post is by Dario Villirilli. In storytelling, world building is the process of constructing an (often imaginary) world in which the story takes place. The art of creating new worlds is essential for  the sci-fi or fantasy writer, but it’s helpful for writers of other genres too, as it is part and parcel of crafting powerful settings. Mastering world building, however, can be quite a challenge: for entirely fictional worlds, you’ll have to introduce lots of novel concepts and details without confusing, overwhelming, or boring the reader (whereas setting your story in our worl ..read more
Visit website
Bringing Setting to Life through Your Characters’ Emotions
Live Write Thrive
by cslakin
3M ago
Here’s a post I wrote some years ago that is worth revisiting! One of the reasons readers willingly immerse themselves in a story is to be transported. Whether it’s to another planet, another era—past or future—or just into a character’s daily life, readers want to be swept away from their world and into another—the world of the writer’s imagination. It’s challenging for writers to know how much detail to put in scenes to effectively transport a reader. Too much can dump info, drag the pacing of the story, and bore or overwhelm. Conversely, too little detail can create confusion or fail to evo ..read more
Visit website

Follow Live Write Thrive on Feedspot

Continue with Google
OR