Happy Chinese New Year
Travelling teapot
by wilson
6d ago
Happy Chinese New Year.  2023 is the year of the rabbit. and falls on 22nd January.   My essential checklist include Mandarin oranges, red packets of money to give to parents and kids, lots of snacks and of course Chinese tea. One last reminder - I will be closing my online store for about 6 months as I will travelling a fair bit. Europe in next 2 months and USA in summer.  Hopefully Malaysia and Hong Kong in between.   I wish all my friends and readers a Happy Chinese New Year.  Live long and prosper.  ..read more
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Selecting Tea For My Overseas Trip
Travelling teapot
by wilson
2w ago
  I had written in my previous blog entry that I will be closing my online store for 6 months - Feb thru July.  I will be travelling and hope to meet tea friends and hope to have a tea session with them.  For 2 months (February and March), I will be in Europe; specifically Paris, Amsterdam and Brussels.  I do not many opportunities to go to Europe and I hope to do the touristy stuff while I am there. If you want to meet me for tea, please let me know. We will have a tea exchange as well.  I will follow up with trips to Hong Kon ..read more
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Happy New Year 2023
Travelling teapot
by wilson
1M ago
Happy New Year to all my readers and friends.  An important announcement. I will be travelling a fair bit next year and I will be suspending my online store sales for about 6 months from mid January 2023.  More updates on my trips to follow.  I will be posting less tea stuff during my travels and I hope to update my store; more tea, better pictures and hopefully better prices.  More info in later posts.   Happy New Year 2023 ..read more
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Back To The Future or Forward To The Past
Travelling teapot
by wilson
1M ago
  We are coming to the end of the year.  Here are my year end thoughts and findings for Chinese tea for this year.  1.  The Chinese lockdown to curb the covid pandemic was a mixed result for Chinese tea. Tea drinkers, old and new, were buying tea and tea ware during the lockdown. Online sales, as expected were higher during this period. My Chinese tea dealer friends took this opportunity to sell tea at a retail level selling tea to families and tea drinkers.  Sales were good but dried up immediately when the lockdown ..read more
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2007 Xiaguan Iron Cake 8633
Travelling teapot
by wilson
2M ago
  Xiaguan tea factory is famous for their pu erh iron cakes and tuos. Many tea drinkers including myself enjoy Xiaguan puerh that has a smoky aroma in the tea.  It is sad that many of their new offerings now do not have the smoky profile.  The Xiaguan iron cake.  There is no metal in the Xiaguan iron cake. The metal name refers to the high compression of the pu erh tea.  The compression is really hard. You simply cannot break up the cake with your bare hands.  Many use a letter opener or knife or an ice pick to break ..read more
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De Hong Pu erh Tea - A Smoky Treat
Travelling teapot
by wilson
2M ago
  I had blogged about this tea last year.  I had wanted to drink a smoky pu erh and this cake was the 1st smoky thing I saw among my tea stash.  I like this tea. This is a 100g De Hong factory mini iron cake. Undated with my guess that it was made around 2008. Initial infusions remind me of a peaty scotch whisky.  If you enjoy drinking peaty scotch whisky, say Talisker 10, this tea is right up your alley. The aroma is almost like this whisky. This tea is to me the non alcoholic version. The smoke does linger in the mouth after every sip. La ..read more
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Gaiwan - Too Hot to Handle
Travelling teapot
by wilson
3M ago
The gaiwan.  It was primarily used to serve tea to guests.  The cover is used to prevent any dirt or dust from landing on the tea. The cover would had helped to keep the tea warm (to an extent).   The gaiwan can be used to brew tea.  No teapot needed. A simple set up of a gaiwan and a couple of teacups are you need to have a great tea session.  Place tea leaves in the gaiwan and add hot water.  Hold the gaiwan in one hand, tilt the cover a little bit and pour out the tea into the teacups. You only tilt the cover only enough to pour out the tea w ..read more
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Late 90s Langhe Ripe pu erh
Travelling teapot
by wilson
4M ago
  Gather round and admire this old 97 loose Langhe ripe pu erh.  You will realise there is nothing extraordinary by just looking at the tea leaves. You have to simply brew the tea leaves to appreciate the taste and aroma of an old pu erh.  Such tea would not appeal to some pu erh collectors where the tea is treated as a stamp or butterfly collection. There is no fancy wrapper, brand or vintage on the tea. It is difficult to show off this tea.  I had to use a couple of larger containers to store this pu erh as well.  Back to this tea ..read more
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2011 Xiaguan Gold Impression Cake
Travelling teapot
by wilson
5M ago
  There was a time around 2010-2012 where there were cakes that used older maocha in making the cake.  Many major tea factories got on the bandwagon and offered pu erh tea that had a few years of age in the tea. This meant that these factories had pu erh tea leaves sitting in their warehouses for a few years and are now pressing these older stock into cakes or bricks and made them for sale.  This would appeal to some buyers as this tea would not be considered as 'new' tea and is more ready to drink.  This 2011 Xiaguan cake used 6 year old pu ..read more
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Golden Key Oolong
Travelling teapot
by wilson
5M ago
This is Golden Key oolong.  Oolong produced in Fujian, Xiamen have names given by a tea village or town.  Such names are meant to give a uniqueness to their oolong produced there. You would know the popular oolong names like Shui Hsien, Tie Kuan Yin and Rougui. Other lesser known oolong names include thousand mile fragrance, Fo Shou (buddha palm) and half waist squat (I kid you not). This Golden Key oolong (2018 production) I had purchased is from the famous Sea Dyke factory. Sea Dyke labelled this tea as Golden Key rock tea that suggested that this tea may ha ..read more
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